The Stars, My Brothers

Narrated by: Jim Roberts
Length: 1 hr and 39 mins
3.5 out of 5 stars (9 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Edmond Moore Hamilton was a popular science-fiction author during the "Golden Age" of American science fiction."The Stars, My Brothers" is considered one of his best, and certainly most imaginative, stories.

A spaceman is killed in space and frozen. He is left orbiting the space station where he was killed in the hope that a method will be found to bring him back to life. That day finally comes a hundred years later, when he awakens to a very different world and comes to realize he has become both a symbol and a pawn in a human/alien conflict.

©2009 Jimcin Recordings (P)2009 Jimcin Recordings

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Good story

Good sci-fi story. Has a message about tolerance as well but it's done in an unobtrusive way i.e. not preachy. Reader was pretty good as well.

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Great Classic SF

This is a short story that will make you think. Reed Kieran has the misfortune to be frozen to death on a space station orbiting the earth in the twenty-first century. He then suffers the greater misfortune of being revived by a cabal who wishes to use him to win a political debate in the twenty-second century. On the surface this is a fairly straightforward adventure story, but the climax depends completely on your understanding of such heady concepts as the meaning of humanity, civilization, intelligence and nature.

In the future humans have spread to the stars and discovered other humans on many planets—humans who are not so technologically advanced as those originating on earth. On one world they find a race of very primitive humans (think caveman) living on the same planet as a technologically sophisticated reptilian race. What should be done with the humans? Are they effectively animals or should they be educated and helped to reach their potential as expressed by humans from earth? And what to do about the reptilian species who does not want earth’s humans meddling with their planet.

Hamilton makes this exploration into these very serious issues eminently entertaining. If you like a good adventure story with a little bit of deep thinking, you should give this tale a try.