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Publisher's Summary

Called the "fifth-most important sociological book of the 20th century" by the International Sociological Association, this groundbreaking study of knowledge introduces the concept of "social construction" into the social sciences for the first time.

In it, Berger and Luckmann reformulate the task of the sociological subdiscipline that, since Max Scheler, has been known as the sociology of knowledge.

©1966 Peter L. Berger and Thomas Luckmann (P)2017 Tantor

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Overwhelming the first listen

Would you listen to The Social Construction of Reality again? Why?

Ofcourse! There's so much information that it can't be absorbed on the first read.

What did you like best about this story?

It makes the information pretty accessible but it's still a barrage of theory.

What does David Colacci bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Time to do stuff while you listen

If you could give The Social Construction of Reality a new subtitle, what would it be?

I wouldn't. The subtitle is perfect. It is a treatise indeed.

Any additional comments?

I loved it. Since I study psychology at a graduate level, I could understand the basics of the book but there was so much information that I would have to listen again to get it all. If you miss 5 minutes of the book, you miss a chunk of knowledge.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful