adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $24.95

Buy for $24.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Aleksia, Queen of the Northern Lights, is mysterious, beautiful, and widely known to have a heart of ice. No one would seek her wisdom except as a last resort. But when she's falsely accused of unleashing evil on nearby villages, she realizes there's an impostor out there far more heartless than she could ever be.

And when a young warrior following the Tradition disappears, leaving his sweetheart and mother to fear the worst, Aleksia's powers are needed as never before.

Now, on a journey through a realm of perpetual winter, it will take all her skills, a mother's faith and a little magic to face down an enemy more formidable than any she has ever known....

©2008 Mercedes Lackey (P)2008 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about The Snow Queen

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    237
  • 4 Stars
    137
  • 3 Stars
    60
  • 2 Stars
    11
  • 1 Stars
    9
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    234
  • 4 Stars
    94
  • 3 Stars
    25
  • 2 Stars
    7
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    200
  • 4 Stars
    98
  • 3 Stars
    57
  • 2 Stars
    7
  • 1 Stars
    2

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Love the book, narrator problematic...

I love Mercedes Lackey and this series too. I was really excited when books 1 and 2 in the series were released as well as this, book 4. Its been around for a while but I didn't buy it till it looked like the rest in the series would also be coming out.

The story is fun, easy to follow, if fairly predictable, but I don't really mind that as it is based around well known fairy tales after all!

The only problem I had is that the narrator, Gabra Zackman, didn't know the word 'mage'. Instead she consistently says 'madge' throughout the book, which, as the word comes up fairly often, I found exceedingly annoying. There were a couple of other problems, like a girl wandering through a forest full of bandits with golden 'plates' (rather than plaits) wound round her head, but these are one offs, so not too problematic. The continual mispronunciation of mage, however, had me yelling MAGE at my computer every few minutes as I listened, and wondering whether the narrator had been paid a 'wadge' rather than a wage!

Other than this problem, the narration was really good and enjoyable, and in the recordings of books 1 and 2, the same narrator does a great job, AND has learned the word mage! So I am really hoping that when they get to this point in the series, they will re-record the book so I can enjoy it fully, along with the rest of the series.

14 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Good Listen

I had read two or three other books in the 500 Kingdoms series. They aren't great works of literature but they are inventive and fun. I enjoy the author's work so I picked this one up.
It was good, the story pans back and forth between two areas of focus for much of the book, which was a little difficult at first because there's often no marker to indicate the switch. I was irked at the pronunciation of the word "mage," but other than that the narrator did an excellent job, even the accents were good.
The story was interesting and engaging, and I didn't see the ending coming. I would recommend the book to any fantasy lover as an interesting view on fairytales.

8 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great, except for the mispronunciation ...

I love Mercedes Lackey stories and have all her books. This story is very enjoyable, but the narrator mispronounces 'mage' as maj or maj-is (mages). That simply made me crazy and I can't figure out why the producers didn't stop it. Such a simple thing, but when it would irk the heck out of me every single time I heard another 'maj', I realized that much more and I would have stopped listening to the story. Now I'm worried about listening to another book read by this narrator, even though she has a beautiful voice. Although, her voices for the different characters seemed to change a bit as well. Regardless, I would still recommend this story for a light and enjoyable listen.

This book served me well while on a two month road trip, as it kept me busy while on a few very long days of driving.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Pleasantly surprised (and annoyed)

I've been a Mercedes Lackey fan, but hadn't read or listened to any of this series and was pleasantly surprised because I thought fairy tales??? It turns out that setting a novel in a fairy tale universe makes for an enjoyable fantasy novel. I got wrapped up in the story line which was fun even though it was fairy tale predictable. I've always been able to care about M.L.'s characters and these were no exception. I even eventually overlooked the narrator's frequent mispronunciation of the word "mage" which is a shame because she did a good job otherwise.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Pronunciation is a problem

How could the performance have been better?

I really wish the narrator had taken the time to figure out how to pronounce certain of the words in this book. Other reviews have mentioned the mispronunciation of the word "mage", so I won't belabour that, but the narrator also repeatedly mispronounces "Sami" (She says Sam-eye instead of Sam-ee.) As with the word mage, you might think, "Well, but how often could that possibly come up? I'm sure it won't be a problem." It comes up a lot though. Probably almost as much as "mage." I've listened to, and enjoyed, other performances by Gabra Zackman, but this one made me want to shoot myself. I spent a lot of my listening time muttering correct pronunciations under my breath.

Any additional comments?

I enjoy the Five Hundred Kingdoms series, but this installment is merely "Okay." Were I to rank them in order of preference, this book would take the bottom spot.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

lazy narrator

Okay, I like the idea of this series, so I am continuing, and I have had so many people recommend Mercedes Lackey to me that I am giving this a go. The writing is better in this book than book #1, though she does have her darling words, which bug me. The story here is not a problem.

However, the narrator here is lazy. It's like she doesn't pay attention to what she's saying and gets the emphasis and cadence dead wrong too often. Preatchett's narrators actually read the book prior to recording and asked him for clarification when they couldn't make it out. I wish the reader had done so here. She just gets into a sort of sing-songy reading-aloud-in-class rhythm and plunges onward.

Also, this book in particular has clear references to the Kalevala, yet she can't be bothered to learn how to pronounce Sámi. I mean, there's a flippin' accent on the first syllable, so why would you think it was "same-EYE"? And the names... Gah. I mean, if you are Eastern European, book #3 is going to be like listening to Americans mispronounce your name all day long. She completely mangled Belarus in book #3.

Now, if some may argue that this is fantasy and the pronunciations are up to interpretation, but not when you are borrowing from an existing culture. Respect the culture enough to learn how to say the names.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Great story, but

Mercedes Lackey never fails in delivering a great book. My only complaint, is not with the book itself but with Audible advertising the book as a "sizzling" level romance in the romance package. That title would be better suited to Fortune's Fool. The amount of romance in this book barely qualifies as sweet.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Needed pronunciation help

Gabra is a very good reader. Unfortunately there one specific word she consistently mispronounced: "mage." It started grating on my nerves once I realized what she was saying. She pronounced it like the word "mad" with a "g" instead of like "may" with a "g." Did she even bother to look it up?

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Bad writing

I recently listened to The Snow Queen written by Mercedes Lackey and narrated by Gabra Zackman.

This is the fourth book in the Five Hundred Kingdoms series. While it has some recurring characters from past books, this book behaves for the most part as a standalone novel.

Aleskia, the Ice Queen, watches the world from her ice palace. It's to this place that she forces young men to slave in her service until their pride is broken by her trials, for they could not be trusted to turn away from evil if they weren't broken by her. The same trials are used to strengthen the women in their lives so that they can stand up to their mercurial men and take the abuse such give them in the spirit of love.

It comes to her attention that another Ice Queen has arisen. She is destroying whole villages and claiming to be the Ice Queen herself. This false queen even has an ice palace. In order to defend her reputation as the harsh, but just, mistress of ice she must find a way to stop her imposter.

Narration: Gabra Zackman does an excellent job with narration, giving life and depth to the characters. She was truly one of the high points of this, otherwise, weak novel.

Conclusion: This book continues to use the excuse of the 'Tradition,' a magical force that makes people behave in traditional roles, as a force to explain the troubling parts of this world. This book is the most extreme version of it I have seen so far and the trope has worn paper thin. It's weak storytelling that portrays misogyny and misandry as the norm, due to the tradition. This lack of creativity and character development is bad enough that I would suggest avoiding this book altogether. 

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Kind of hard to follow changes in chars.

If I wasn’t paying very close attention I’d find myself asking “wait, what’s going on?!” The chapter changes with different characters were somewhat difficult to discern. And another thing- it’s Mage like Sage or Page. Not Mage like Badge. It just annoyed me.