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Publisher's Summary

Sharing isn't new. Giving someone a ride, having a guest in your spare room, running errands for someone, participating in a supper club - these are not revolutionary concepts. What is new in the "sharing economy" is that you are not helping a friend for free; you are providing these services to a stranger for money.

In this book, Arun Sundararajan, an expert on the sharing economy, explains the transition to what he describes as "crowd-based capitalism" - a new way of organizing economic activity that may supplant the traditional corporate-centered model. As peer-to-peer commercial exchange blurs the lines between the personal and the professional, how will the economy, government regulation, what it means to have a job, and our social fabric be affected?

Drawing on extensive research and numerous real-world examples, Sundararajan explains the basics of crowd-based capitalism. He describes the intriguing mix of "gift" and "market" in its transactions, demystifies emerging blockchain technologies, and clarifies the dizzying array of emerging on-demand platforms. He then considers how this new paradigm changes economic growth and the future of work.

©2016 Arun Sundararajan (P)2016 Tantor

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Relevant & engaging

This book is accessible to both top-notch-economists and laypeople alike. It was a fascinating listen.

The subject is of such vast economic importance, and yet it's so personal to each of us in the developed world. The emergence and growth of peer-to-peer services in the past few years has been staggering. Economic activity is shifting away from central institutions to services provided by other individuals who have access to goods. The range of services is stunning — you can get a ride, order food, crash on someone's couch, ship an unwieldy object, have your clothes laundered, book a massage therapist, or become a startup investor, all with a few taps on your phone.

As the scope of peer-to-peer markets expands, we're taking economic activity out of institutions. In the established model, most economic activity was controlled by large companies. Now we have a digitally controlled model — a platform that sits btw people who have time, have stuff, or have $, and people who need those things. Loved the discussion on what makes people trust each other enough for these high-stakes interactions, the "digital online reputation circles."

Which brings me to the most interesting aspect of the sharing economy, and of the book — the implications both for regulation & for the workforce. On the one hand, value is captured by people below median income, which is a promise of inclusive growth. On the other hand — well, you should get the book.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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some of the best audio reading experiences I had

some of the best audio reading experiences I had listed to for sure really good stuff

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Great book for anyone creating digital apps

This book is a life changer in so many ways. It connects many of the puzzle pieces together and shows you how they interact. Great book! In the future everyone has value.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Interesting Content, Dubious Conclusions

Draws a questionable dichotomy between a market economy and a gift economy. Ignores the ability of platforms (i.e. Uber) to concentrate power and profits to themselves at the expense of the "micro entrepreneurs" who provide their property or services (i.e. Uber drivers). The general tone is very optimistic that sharing will bring about greater equality, which I think overlooks the fact that potential providers still have to have the means to own spare property before being able to rent it out through sharing platforms.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Very enlightening book

I rthouroughly enjoyed this book and gives a glimpse of the changes that the workplace is undergoing. It gives food for thought for the place makers for independent labor.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Great economic outlook on effect of tech

The author does an excellent job capturing the economics behind where this sharing trend is headed. Being an Econ major and an MBA I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It's an easy digestible read. strongly recommend it.

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The age of crowd control

Certainly we are seeing big data, and crowd information used, whether it's for funding, sourcing, evaluating, servicing and everything else.

It is clear that crowd intelligence is superior to the old fashioned experts, and the large internet companies are using this information to enrich themselves.

The question is will this continue in a society where the rich get richer leaving everyone else behind. This book raises some thought provoking questions about Web 2.0 or what the author calls the sharing economy.

Highly recommended as a starting point to understand the type of revolution we are currently undergoing. I appreciate the authors honesty in admitting the difficulty in predicting what will come next.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Good. Offers more beyond what's in other books

Would you listen to The Sharing Economy again? Why?

There have been dozens of books on the sharing economy, crowdsourcing, and platforms. I was worried it would be yet another reincarnation that simply repackages old facts, stories, and anecdotes, as I've seen so much before.
And while some stuff in "The Sharing Economy" is repetitive (we've all heard the stories of Airbnb and Uber so many times), the book does offer lots of new insights. It also does a great job classifying and structuring the information about the sharing economy, the types, definitions, principles, etc.
Not a good choice for practitioners, but a great one for academics or those who want to better understand the big picture, and not necessarily get a practical advice on how to launch your own sharing business.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Part esearch part prophesy and part textbook

As a fan of technology, economics and business model innovation I enjoyed every chapter of the book. The book walks the fine line between lecturing and provoking thought. It also backs up opinion with research. Highly recommend it

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Fantastic!!!

This is a great books! I highly recommend it from an economic and startup perspective.