• The Sea Wolf

  • By: Jack London
  • Narrated by: Frank Muller
  • Length: 9 hrs and 11 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (785 ratings)

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The Sea Wolf  By  cover art

The Sea Wolf

By: Jack London
Narrated by: Frank Muller
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Editorial reviews

Frank Muller does wonders with the story of foppish Humphrey Van Weyden, who grows stronger after his experiences at sea. Muller’s chilling interpretation of the sadistic captain, Wolf Larsen, is outstanding, lending an air of anticipated violence as conditions aboard the Ghost grow more dire. Given London’s well-drawn characters and thrill-a-moment plotting, including a shipwreck and a mutiny, Muller creates genuine personalities for major and secondary characters. It’s always possible to tell who’s speaking without the usual identifiers. One of audio’s finest voice actors, Muller performs London’s exciting adventure in a way that is completely satisfying.

Publisher's summary

Wealthy ne'er-do-well Humphrey Van Weyden is a castaway who is put to work on the schooner Ghost, run by brutal Wolf Larsen. Toughened by life at sea, Humphrey develops the strength to protect another castaway, Maud Brewster, and stand up to the increasingly deranged Larsen. Experience the crashing, relentless power of the sea through this compelling story, made hauntingly immediate by author London's vivid prose.

Public Domain (P)1988 Recorded Books, Inc.

Critic reviews

"Muller reads with expression and variety that match the varying moods, feelings, and attitudes of all the characters, dogs included." (Kliatt Magazine)
"It gave us the sense of the cold, the snow, and most of all, the primeval feelings that London described." (The New Yorker)