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Publisher's Summary

Four chilling true-crime stories in one collection from the best-selling author Ryan Green.

Volume one contains some of Green’s most fascinating accounts of violence, abuse, deception, and murder. Within this collection, you'll receive:

Harold Shipman: The True Story of Britain’s Most Notorious Serial Killer

The story of Britain’s most notorious serial killer, Harold Shipman, from his upbringing, his victims, his trial, and his motivations. Shipman killed no less than 218 of his patients, making him Britain’s most prolific serial killer. 

What possessed a respected and trusted man to abuse his power on such a grand scale?

Colombian Killers: The True Stories of the Three Most Prolific Serial Killers on Earth

Luis Alfredo Garavito, Pedro Alonzo Lopez, and Daniel Camargo Barbosa are among the most prolific serial killers in the world. Between them, they were convicted of 329 murders, but it’s believed the number they committed is over 750. 

Fred & Rose West: Britain’s Most Infamous Killer Couples

This chilling audiobook is based on the true life events of Britain’s most infamous killer couple, Rosemary and Frederick West, and the terror they wreaked on their hometown before their apprehension in 1994. The story includes decades of child abuse, an underground torture chamber, and a burial ground containing the bodies of the spent victims - including that of their missing daughter.

The Kurim Case: A Terrifying True Story of Child Abuse, Cults & Cannibalism

A horrific narrative uncovered by accident exposes a mother and sister’s sadistic acts of child abuse, confinement, and even cannibalism of two young boys. But this turned out to be the tip of the iceberg. The child abuse was performed at a much larger scale.

©2018 Ryan Green (P)2018 Ryan Green

What listeners say about The Ryan Green True Crime Collection: Volume 1

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2nd Volume is MUCH better

1st-volume is more statement-of-fact than story. I wouldn't have bought the 2nd-volume based on the 1st, but I bought them both at the same time. The 2nd-volume is much more suspenseful and story-telling, the 1st-volume was tough to get through. Both volumes are graphic (rape, bondage).

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Good first book of series

I started out with the last book of the series and decided to try them all. Most of the stories here were unknown to me and it was interesting to listen to them. Overall I found this very well written and informative.

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True Crime

This was a very interesting full look at true crimes that gives perfect facts and takes you on the full trip of the crime. Very well written. I like that the author never held back on aspects of each crime. Will definitely be looking into more volumes of Ryan Greens.

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Chilling tales on the worst of humanity

Ryan Green's True Crime Collection has definitely had me coming back to recollect my thoughts on how bad humanity can go. I've known from education about some of these monsters written about in this book, but to the extend written was very eye opening. The Narration by Ernie Sprance was very well done. He had a good pace and got the story across efficiently. Great job. I'd definitely not recommend this audiobook to anyone who is easily upset by how far some of historys most evil people can go. That said, I highly do recommend this audiobook for potential listeners. It was a very enjoyable listen. This audiobook was given to me for free for my own honest review. I voluntarily left this review on my own accord.

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Captivating collection...

This captivating collection of true crime features 4 chilling cases of murder, madness, and mayhem on a scale that defies sanity or reason. Be advised that the subject material is inherently violent and may be disturbing to some readers. Included in this collection are: 1) Harold Shipman: The True Story of Britain’s Most Notorious Serial Killer – This clear and concise story focuses on the details of his misdeeds and offers a cogent analysis of the series of events leading to his apprehension and conviction in a straightforward and unembellished manner. While the exact number of Dr. Shipman’s victims may never be known, it is estimated to be in the neighborhood of 250. He was convicted of only 15 of those heinous acts. His exploitation of weaknesses in the British medical system led to a massive overhaul of that system in an effort to circumvent any further betrayals of the public’s trust in their health care system. 2) Colombian Killers: The True Stories of the Three Most Prolific Serial Killers on Earth – A succinct and riveting summary of the lives and misdeeds of three of the most prolific and sadistic serial killers the world has ever known. Luis Alfredo Garavito lured over 147 young boys (ages 6 to 16) to gruesome and horrifically brutal deaths. Pedro Alonzo Lopez, quite possibly the most prolific serial killer the world has known, convicted of callously murdering 110 young girls but actually confessed to the sexual assault and strangulation of over 300. The third subject, Daniel Camargo Barbosa, was a highly intelligent and revoltingly sadistic killer, convicted of the murder and mutilation of 72 women (though the actual number of victims is thought to be around 150). The sheer magnitude of the body count coupled with the overwhelming brutality of the acts committed by these three men has left an indelible mark on Colombian history. 3) Fred & Rose West: Britain’s Most Infamous Killer Couples - This book offers a succinct but riveting account of the events which occurred at 25 Cromwell Street in Gloucester, England, which came to light when Fred and Rose West were apprehended in 1994. “The House of Horrors”, as their home became known, was the site of incalculable suffering in the form of child abuse, sadistic torture, and multiple murders. It is difficult to imagine such atrocities occurring in a neighborhood without attracting the attention of neighbors and, ultimately, law enforcement but the Wests managed to keep their depravities secret for years before justice finally caught up to them. 4) The Kuřim Case: A Terrifying True Story of Child Abuse, Cults & Cannibalism – A detailed narrative of the actions of Klára Mauerová, the 29-year-old mother of the two boys who are at the center of a truly bizarre story featuring abuse, exploitation, torture, a religious cult and cannibalism is presented in this book. It clearly reconstructs the events and identifies the various people and their roles in this vile and sordid affair. In a stunning example of truth being stranger than fiction, this story includes everything from falsified adoptions, false identities, psychological manipulation and tracking the flight of an international fugitive. Each story in this collection appears to have been thoroughly researched and painstakingly analyzed resulting in a clear and concise narrative of events. Additionally, a detailed and insightful profile of all involved parties is presented yielding a comprehensive picture of some of the most unsettling and scandalous events in recent history. This is a must-have collection for the library of any fan of the true crime genre. I chose to read along as I listened to the audio version of this collection and I felt that Ernie Sprance did an excellent job narrating this group of stories. I was provided with an audio copy of this true crime collection by the author and I am voluntarily offering my honest and unbiased review.

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Narration was 'ehhh

The stories would have been good, I just could not get into this one. I am glad I listened to collection 2 and 3 before I listened to this one. The narrator is very blah and I just could not listen all the way through. I found myself thinking about other things while this was on. I highly recommend Ryan Green's Vol 2 & 3. The narration is great for those two

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less substance than any cheesy show on ID channel

lifelessly written.. instead of a hot juicy steak, this was cold dry, dessicated beef jerky.. that is exactly what the author did with these amazing stories. he sucked the lifes blood right out of them. chilling animalistic acts are conveyed with less impact than the waiter when he asks if I want soup or salad with my meal. there is no effort to humanize the victims or empathize with anyone other than the assailant, yet even that was in the form of low effort excuses. to be fair, I haven't completed the story of Pueblo Lopez but I had to pause it for this review.. now, I'm not one who offends easily, but I hope the victims families never read his version of this story. the author has blamed his childhood, society, the mother (predictably) he actually referred to this sadistic murderer as vulnerable and " a victim" under normal circumstances I'd consider it redundant to make such an obvious statement, but sadly, this reality was overlooked by the author so here goes: millions of kids grew up on the streets of Colombia, many were raped, victimized, addicted to drugs, and ,"at the mercy of abusive women" yet they didn't become sadistic, serial-killer-torturer-rapists.. I can't believe I paid to listen to the equivalent of some guy blaming the system for the acts of vicious criminals. I do find the dark recesses of the mind that drive such acts fascinating, but the author doesn't go there, he offers nothing new or interesting, just a brief, dry description of the crime followed by endless paragraphs of vapid cliches and lame excuses. this was my first negative review, normally if I don't like something I chalk it up to personal taste, and that others may find it of some value. in this case, I can't fathom anyone finding this book remotely interesting, no matter your point of view. he took stories full of so many interesting, taboo subjects and reduced it to a dry, vacant, boring, soulless essay.

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True Crime Nightmares

I have read true crime books for a very long time. I, along with most people, will seek out information about the worst among us. I don't really know what the fascination for it is. Maybe we're trying to understand thought processes that are completely foreign to us. I requested and received a review copy of this book based on my curiosity about these cases. I am now giving my voluntary review. Ryan Green has written a collection of cases detailing crimes committed by several people. Some worked alone and some acted in concert with others. He spends some time discussing their childhoods. There is also discussion of what could possibly be their individual triggers that compelled them to commit their crimes. I like the "just the facts, ma'am" style that Green uses. I don't really like books and TV programs that purport to be nonfiction but then dramatize much of the content. I prefer more of a 'Dateline' style, less Investigation Discovery. If this is the style you like too, you'll definitely want to pick up this book. The narration by Ernie Sprance is well done. It has a nice newscaster quality to it, giving Green's text the impact that is intended. Recommended to those with interest in exploring the darkness that dwells in some of us. As I'm sure most people would be aware, this book is very graphic in detailing the horrendous things that these people perpetrate on their fellow humans. Proceed wisely.

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4 Gruesome True Stories Written by the Finest

"This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review." Harold Shipman: The True Story of Britain's Most Notorious Serial Killer (True Crime, Serial Killers, Murderers) Thoughts: Was too fast paced for my taste and unfortunately, there really wasn’t much of a “story” as to what made him who he was. There were a lot of hypothesis and what-if’s but not one of the stories I’m used to reading from this author where there’s more of an understanding as to who the person was and how they became to be what they were. Colombian Killers: The True Stories of the Three Most Prolific Serial Killers on Earth (True Crime, Serial Killers, Murderers) Thoughts: DEFINITELY NOT FOR THE FAINT OF HEART REVOLVING PEDOPHILIA AND RAPE! Enjoyed the authors’ perspective on explaining each of their stories, making sure to include detailed pasts of each killer. Fred & Rose West: Britain's Most Infamous Killer Couples (True Crime, Serial Killers, Murderers) Thoughts: DEFINITELY NOT FOR THE FAINT OF HEART INVOLVING UNCONSENTUAL BDSM ACTS AND GROTESQUE BODY PART REMOVALS! Another novel enjoying the authors’ perspective on explaining the graphic and grotesque acts on Fred and Rose West. Appreciative that the author went into a bit of research into the world of BDSM but felt it wasn’t necessary to make a mockery of it in one specific part involving bondage. This couple, in particular, used BDSM as a way to enforce rape and in that, felt it shouldn’t have even been researched or mentioned in terms of their sexual appetites. This is one of the authors’ writings where he asks MANY questions, forcing you to place yourself into the victims’ shoes. A bit redundant, you’re listening to the story and imagining how on earth something like this could happen but also how a couple could get away with it. It is appreciated that he takes the time to ask the ‘why’ but it seemed like he got a little too carried away trying to put the listener/reader into the victims’ shoes. It was a good telling of their story but one that wasn’t for me, he has other writings that are much better than this, as gory as it was. The Kuřim Case: A Terrifying True Story of Child Abuse, Cults & Cannibalism Thoughts: DEFINITELY NOT FOR THE FAINT OF HEART INVOLVING CHILD ABUSE (SEXUAL, EMOTIONAL, AND PHYSICAL)! This was by far a very difficult read and I’m shocked to hear that the abusers are out walking freely (at least from the time of the writing). It’s a shame when children are treated to the horrors that the author wrote about, naturally written by a true story.

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Mind Boggling

Ryan Green tells a good story. He's right up there with past true crime writers. I don't think there are any of his books I haven't listened to yet read. My mind is boggled over what people are capable of. However, I had to skip the cannibalism story. I'm a bona fide true crime buff but I have my limits and that's one of them. Narration was very good. I can't wait to read another Ryan Green book! I was given this volume at no charge in exchange for an honest review. Although I skipped one story I feel that I have fulfilled my agreement. Thank you!

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  • Natalie
  • 09-21-18

Shocking and thrilling!

A series of true crime stories that focus on Harold Shipman, Fred and Rose West, The Columbian killers: Luis Alfredo Garavito,Pedro Alonzo Lopez, and Daniel Camargo Barbosa and the Kurim Case. I’m a true crime fan, especially when it comes to serial killers. It was Fred and Rose West that caught my eye on this book – they’re a couple that I always like to read or watch programs about because I find it fascinating how somebody could be so cold blooded and cruel…I’d not heard about any of the others but, gosh, they all gave the Wests a real run for their money. The ‘stories’ are really interesting. Green tells them in such a great, way. He obviously has a lot of knowledge on it and focuses fully on facts, making it very clear if something he says is his own opinion or a public assumption. At no point do I feel like he exaggerates or makes anything up, it is very factual and backed up by where he’s found it a lot of the time. Most of these sections had me hooked, I found out more about the Wests than I already knew and the ones that I didn’t know were so interesting and shocking I really enjoyed them. I struggled with the Kurim Case story – not through any fault of the narrator or author – it was just a very confusing case! The narrator, Ernie Sprance is great. He’s very disclosed throughout the audiobook and speaks in such a tone where what he’s saying can be quite chilling, but doesn’t make it dramatic, just reading the facts in front of him. I really enjoyed this book and would definitely read more of Greens work and recommend him to any crime lover.

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  • Linda
  • 06-14-20

Shocking

I don't usually listen to true crime so I don't have much to compare it to, but I found the stories interesting and shocking. It leaves you wondering how these people got away with it for so long. Enjoyable if you don't mind the content matter in your home!

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  • deafmick
  • 05-25-20

I like all of Ryan Green audio book as all ways 5 out of 5

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  • Elizabeth Frounks
  • 12-28-19

Ryan Green = Reliable

I feel like I'm repeating myself a lot with Ryan's books, although I do believe this is my first introduction to Ernie narrating. Ryan has the ability to write in a way that is captivating and he makes it seem as though no time passes when you listen to his books - although Ernie may have had something to do with that as well. The narration was truly well done. *I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

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  • Tim Dearing
  • 09-04-18

A really interesting read, thoroughly enjoyed it

This was a great book. I knew some of the facts about these stories but I have learned a lot more. The narrator was good and read it in an appropriate way ( a bit like a newsreader). This audiobook was given by the author, narrator, or publisher at no cost in exchange for an unbiased review via Audiobook Boom.

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  • Emily
  • 10-07-18

Hit and Miss

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review. Harold Shipman This was pretty good. Rather brief and much more biographical than I was expecting, but it seems rather well researched, especially small medical details, which many would have skimmed over or forgotten completely. Harold Shipman, AKA the most notorious serial killer in British history, used his position as a doctor to kill his patients and rewrote some of their wills in order to take their money. A relatively ingenious idea for the time period, as rules regarding drugs were a lot more lax during his time as a doctor than they are now, even if Shipman bent the rules back then. Tending to focus on geriatric patients and advising loved ones to cremate their parents or partners, he could possibly have continued for years more, had he not made a mistake with one patient called Mrs Grundy. It seems rather incredulous now, looking back in hindsight, that nobody noticed this happening, considering the number of people he killed in such a small GP area. Rating = 4* / 5*. Colombian Killers I found this book to be quite basic. It was only very brief, and I think it suffers for trying to talk about three notorious serial killers in a space/time where he normally only talks about one. There is a general apathy towards the victims of these serial killer's victims and are often just referred to as "runaways" while sympathy is afforded to the said serial killers for growing up poor and being sexually abused. It doesn't negate what they did to the 300+ children mentioned as victims in this book. The book itself felt like one massive attempt to excuse what these serial killers did. It also tended to repeat information. I was told at least three times that Columbia can only imprison people for a maximum of 16 years before it was later changed to forty years. It would have been interesting to have a side note or an end note explaining why this happened, as would have occurred in many other true crime books. It also suffered from mispronunciations which made me cringe throughout the book. Aside from this problem, the narrator, Ernie Sprance, was actually really good and I did enjoy listening to his narration. This concluded with a really weak conclusion. Based off of three serial killers based in and around Colombia, the author concludes that serial killers are either the fault of the parent's / upbringing, or societal expectations. It was a disappointing conclusion and I would have thought that the author would have delved a bit deeper than that. Rating = 1* / 5*. Fred and Rose West I was a tad disappointed by this book. Normally I don't know a lot about the topics discussed in these True Crime books, but I actually know quite a bit about the Wests and as such I noticed quite a lot of errors in this book. I also found the "this may be what they were thinking..." and the "possibly the kids felt like this..." extremely annoying because this is a True Crime book and not a book about the author guessing emotions and motivations. Give me accurate facts and information that doesn't feel like it came out straight out of newspaper articles. Also the last chapter talking about how the Wests were a "normal family". Ughhh. Rating = 1* / 5*. The Kuřim Case This book has left me feeling confused and in need of actual research. The first problem was the Czech language. As the book itself is aimed at English speaking True Crime fans, it would have been nice if Green had used the Czech words the first time and just used the translated versions afterwards, but he continued to use the Czech language throughout, which kept throwing me because I didn't know what they meant and I found it quite hard to follow the book, which was in itself quite hard to follow anyway. The second problem was the writing style. While the case itself seems interesting, albeit gruesome and terrible, the way Green writes makes the case seem a lot more convoluted than it is (it is convoluted but it really isn't as confusing as this book made it seem) and it was very difficult to follow because of the vast amount of people he was mentioning. I understood who Klara and Katarina were, and the two sons, and Barbra, who was Annika and then Adam? and she had a father who kept getting mentioned but there was another family who took her in and they were in Norway but then they were in the Czech Republic? I got that there was a cult involvement, but for the amount of time that this book dedicated to Barbra, I still don't understand who she was, how Klara managed to adopt her as Annika when there were no records of her and she was pretending to be 13 as a 33 year old, how as a woman in her mid thirties she managed to pass as a teenage boy, and what her purpose was? Nobody's motives could be figured out from reading this book and the whole book was just confusing. For once, the author was actually pretty impassive regarding the criminals, which is pretty rare. However, Ernie Sprance was a really good narrator, except for the problem of mispronouncing a couple words. Rating = 2* / 5*.