Regular price: $8.40

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Our failure to appreciate the importance of the public domain—the realm of material that is free for anyone to use without permission or fee—limits free speech, digital creativity, and scientific innovation, argues the author of this book. The public domain is under siege, and James Boyle explains why and how we must protect it.

©2008 Yale University Press (P)2008 Yale University Press

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    10
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    8
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

Great Book, Unpracticed Narrator

This creative commons book is best read, and not listened to. The narrator is not bad overall - his voice has clarity, maturity, warmth and character - but he inserts strange-sounding pauses here and there, which is distracting. You can tell when he's reached the end of a particular line, but not the end of the sentence, which introduces discordance into the listening experience.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Required reading for the informed individual

While the book occasionally drags a little, it is an excellent treatment of the history of intellectual property, the current condition, and where we are headed. The citations of early American leaders are persuasive and the destruction of current misinformation on the topic is effective. Most people have warped, entitled views of intellectual property today, especially those who consider themselves creators. They believe that copyright is a basic inalienable human right, and fair use is an annoying loophole in their otherwise perfect control and ownership of creative (or not so creative) expression. Last, the book addresses some particularly frightening directions intellectual property law is heading, with software patents, bioengineering patents, and lawsuits like Apple's hypocritical "thermonuclear war" on Android.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Kris Als
  • 03-03-17

thought provoking book on property right

Great and well written book on a high impact legal discipline (intellectual property rights) and our legislators' approach to developing this domain. Focus is on what it's there to protect and encourage (a striving public domain for an ever developing human kind) and how our system has lost sight of those values. thoroughly enjoyed the book. An important contribution