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The New Evil

Understanding the Emergence of Modern Violent Crime
Narrated by: Charles Constant
Length: 18 hrs and 25 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (22 ratings)

Regular price: $20.99

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Publisher's Summary

A chilling follow-up to the popular true-crime book The Anatomy of Evil.

Revisiting Dr. Michael Stone's groundbreaking 22-level Gradations of Evil Scale, a hierarchy of evil behavior first introduced in the book The Anatomy of Evil, Stone and Dr. Gary Brucato, a fellow violence and serious psychopathology expert, here provide even more detail, using dozens of cases to exemplify the categories along the continuum. The New Evil also presents compelling evidence that, since a cultural tipping-point in the 1960s, certain types of violent crime have emerged that in earlier decades never or very rarely occurred. 

The authors examine the biological and psychiatric factors behind serial killing, serial rape, torture, mass and spree murders, and other severe forms of violence. They persuasively argue that, in at least some cases, a collapse of moral faculties contributes to the commission of such heinous crimes, such that "evil" should be considered not only a valid area of inquiry, but, in our current cultural climate, an imperative one. They consider the effects of new technologies and sociological, cultural, and historical factors since the 1960s that may have set the stage for "the new evil."

©2019 Michael H. Stone, MD, and Gary Brucato, PhD (P)2019 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"Fascinating, disturbing... Budding criminologists will find this a useful resource for study and contemplation, while true crime enthusiasts will be riveted by the assiduous prodding into the criminal mind." (Publishers Weekly)

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WARNING!!!.....

This book is not for the faint of heart. With that said, this book is one of the best audio books I own in this specific category, which for sake of this review I'll name" true crime books authored by forensic psychiatrists or criminal profilers".

This book far surpasses any book I've read by Douglas, Ressler or Hazelwood and that's because the cases in this book and not the same old regurgitated cases we hear over and over . The last two books I bought from Douglas , I was so bored I had to return one of them.

The other was the same high profile cases he writes about in all his books. The other profilers sugar coat the cases they pick and use the rest of the book to talk about how smart they are as profilers.

This book has really interesting cases , some I've never heard of, which is rare for the reasons I stated above. The cases that are well known , the "regurgitated"cases, at least have info added that I have never heard before and they do go into graphic detail but the delivery is done by a very pleasant sounding narrator.

This book is extremely graphic and extremely good. True crime lovers, you WILL NOT be disappointed!

Enjoyed thoroughly, thank you!

14 of 14 people found this review helpful

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Maybe not the best pick for audio

I’m familiar with Dr. Stone from the show “Most Evil” and LOVE true crime and psychology. I am sure this is a fantastic book if read but as an audiobook it was really easy to tune out and it almost lulled me to sleep several times. I listen to lots of audiobooks and podcasts so it’s not that I’m just unfamiliar with the concept, this one I often tuned out and missed big chunks. I tried relistening but experienced the same thing. The narrator was kind of monotone and spoke a little too fast so I think this greatly contributed to the feeling but I think some books are just better on paper (or screen).