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The Modern Scholar: Command and Control

Great Military Leaders from Washington to the Twenty-First Century
Narrated by: Mark R. Polelle
Length: 7 hrs and 30 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (31 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Professor Mark R. Polelle examines great military leaders in history, beginning with George Washington and moving on to Napoleon, U.S. Grant, Pershing, MacArthur, and Schwarzkopf, among others. The course also addresses the politics of military history and leadership and illustrates the circumstances that enable the rise of great leaders. Perhaps most importantly, Professor Polelle raises and answers that essential question: What is it that makes a good leader?

©2010 Mark R. Polelle (P)2010 Recorded Books, LLC

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  • Hal VT
  • Bennington, VT USA
  • 07-04-14

Portraits of military leadership

Would you listen to The Modern Scholar: Command and Control again? Why?

Probably not - though I might listen to specific chapters on certain leaders to reorient myself to them when I run across them in other books.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Pershing was interesting. On the flip side, I came away with less respect for Patton.

Any additional comments?

Most of this is broken down into portraits of particular leaders in the United States' major military conflicts, though there are also interesting chapters on how western military leadership changed from the French Napoleonic model to the Prussian model. The transition from horseback generals to administrators gives better understanding of the context in which each of these men succeeded in their craft. Overall, it was informative and interesting, and I'd recommend it to anyone wanting an overview of the evolution of western military methods and leadership.