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Publisher's Summary

The Last Kabbalist ofLisbon, an international best seller, is an extraordinary novel that transports listeners into the universe of Jewish Kabbalah during the Lisbon massacre of April 1506. Just a few years earlier, Jews living in Portugal were dragged to the baptismal font and forced to convert to Christianity. Many of these “New Christians” persevered in their Jewish prayers and rituals in secret and at great risk…the hidden, arcane practices of the kabbalists, a mystical sect of Jews, continued as well.
©2013 Richard Zimler (P)2013 Blackstone Audio

What listeners say about The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Definitely a great read for historical fiction

This is a wonderful novel of a geographic history I wouldn’t have learned otherwise. Engaging, but a bit long. But setting in for good writing is always worth it. Recommended

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    2 out of 5 stars
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Shaking my head

Trying to figure out who the intended audience was for this book. It’s basically a who done it but only understandable by someone with a decent Jewish education. It seems so formulaic to me. Our hero goes convinced that he knows who done it and he’s wrong. Then he figures out another person who done it and investigate that and he’s wrong. Over and over again. I had 10 minutes left in the book and I gave up. I just didn’t care.