• The Indian Empire At War

  • From Jihad to Victory, the Untold Story of the Indian Army in the First World War
  • By: George Morton-Jack
  • Narrated by: Roger Davis
  • Length: 19 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History, Asia
  • 5.0 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $21.81

Buy for $21.81

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

A brilliantly original history of the First World War, retracing the footsteps of the Indian army's 1.5 million men who, in 1914-18, served about the globe from Europe to Africa, Asia and the Indian Ocean. 

After years of neglect, The Indian Empire at War raises the curtain on the Indian soldiers' personal experiences fighting for the Allies against the Central Powers and returning home to play their part in the Indian Independence movement.

©2018 George Morton-Jack (P)2018 Hachette Audio UK

What listeners say about The Indian Empire At War

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for SandyS
  • SandyS
  • 02-17-20

Excellent and unique historical view

This is a wonderfully written overview of this piece of history. I learned more that I might have imagined about this subject and an equally impressed at and appalled by the experiences of these men (and o think it was exclusively men who were allowed to serve). The scope of coverage is such that it encourages greater discovery being the detail possible in this book. The prose is clear, informative and entertaining. Well done... this feels like a unique collection of information, presented sensitively and respectfully.

My single criticism is in the choice of reader of the audible version. Roger Davis appears to have made less than zero effort in learning how to pronounce any non-European words or names. He comes across, therefore, much as one of the colonial sahibs would have done. My irritation at his ham-fisted pronunciations grew and grew. It is testimony to the excellence of the writing that I decided to dissociate the book from the reader, but it wasn’t easy.