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The History of Rome, Volume 2: Books 6 - 10

Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
Length: 14 hrs and 1 min
Categories: Classics, Nonfiction
4.5 out of 5 stars (64 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Livy continues his magnificent epic, with Rome in complete ruin after the Gallic invasion and sack of the city in 310 B.C. Led by Camillus, one of Rome's great heroic patricians, the city regains her self-confidence and once more becomes the leader of the Latin people.

Painstakingly rebuilding alliances, forging friendships, cementing relations among her own people, and fighting endless wars, Rome soon becomes the dominant power among the fractious Italic tribes on the Latin plain. For 50 years, the Romans maintain political and economic stability while pursuing an aggressive stance toward the other, more distant, warlike Italic peoples. Rome is under constant threat of invasion from many quarters and her disciplined soldiers are kept in perfect training. And they need to be.

After many decades, the Romans finally manage to conquer the Etruscans and the mighty Samnites, at last bringing most of the Italian peninsula under their control. Livy's The History of Rome continues in an additional four volumes.

Public Domain (P)2010 Audio Connoisseur

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Titus Livius Patavinus comes alive!!!!

What made the experience of listening to The History of Rome, Volume 2: Books 6 - 10 the most enjoyable?

Charlton Griffin's performance brings out the triumphs, disasters, religious rites, the plebeian successions, Patrician condescension, arrogance, and daring. The struggles of the kings of Rome, the patrician dominance, and finally the inclusion of the plebeians after the reorganization of the Roman Republic is vivid, captivating, and exciting. Charlton Griffin's narration is as splendid, possibly even better than his performance of Polybius's Rome and the Mediterranean vol. 1 and 2.

Would you recommend The History of Rome, Volume 2: Books 6 - 10 to your friends? Why or why not?

I would recommend the text for its overall dialogue and for the information which can be gained about the Carthaginians, Latins, Volscians, Sabines, Gauls, and other peoples. It is a well rounded history, of which most of the history is uncorroborated, but the majesty in which the history is written and narrated makes up for any of those shortcomings (concerning the story, not actual history). This, of course means caveat emptor...buyer beware. If you love history for history's sake, then you will love it!!!!

Have you listened to any of Charlton Griffin’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Yes I have, and it is as good as any other performance I have heard from Charlton.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

All of it!!!!

Any additional comments?

I will continue to purchase any books that are narrated by Charlton Griffin. Thank you Mr. Griffin.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Darwin8u
  • Mesa, AZ, United States
  • 11-27-18

Oratory was invented for doubtful matters

Book 6 (Roman Campaigns) & Book 7 (Roman Expansion)

Books 6 and 7 of Livy's History of Rome (403-342 BC). One of my favorite characters in the book is Marcus Furius Camillus, one of Rome's great, early generals. He was given at his death the title of Second Founder of Rome after he helped to defend a sacked Rome against the Senoni chieftain Brennus and his gallic warriors.

Some men are generals. Some are statesmen. Others just seem to have it all. Camellus is one of those men who seem destined to lead, protect, and inspire. These three books are filled with battles, wars, and manly, martial speeches. I think one of the best parts of these early Roman histories of Livy are his speeches. Obviously, he is embellishing things and probably making a great deal up, but still -- this is damn good stuff.

Here are some of his best lines:

"Soldiers, what means this gloom and this unwonted reluctance? Are you strangers to the enemy, or to me, or to yourselves? The enemy -- what else are they but inexhaustible material for you to fashion into glorious deeds of valor? " (Book VI, vii 3).

"...a young soldier rebuked them, so the story runs, for questioning whether any blessing were more Roman than arms and valor." (Book VII, vi 3).

***

Book 8 (Revolt of the Latins) & Book 9 (Roman Expansion) & Book 10 (Battle of Aquilonia)

The second half of this section contains Livy's History of Rome covers books 8 through 10 (341-292BC). It also contains the summaries for the some of Livy's missing books (11 - 20).

This volume deals with various revolts among those groups Rome has treaties with (Latins, Companians, Privernates, Samnites, Apulians, Etruscans, Umbrians, Marsi, the Paeligni, Aequi, etc.). This is a period of quick Roman growth. They are starting to feel their imperial oats.

My favorite part of this volume deals with the leadership and generalship of men such as Titus Manlius, Quintus Fabius, Appius Claudius. This period parallels the period of Alexander the Great in the East.

Here are some of his best lines:

"...an aspect more august than a man's, as though sent from heaven to expiate all anger of the gods, and to turn aside destruction from his people and bring it on their adversaries. Thus every terror and dread attended him..." (Book VIII, ix.9)

"You shall find few in the saddle, few sword in hand; while they are loading themselves and their horses with spoils, cut them down unarmed and make it a bloody booty for them." (Book VIII, xxxviii.15)

"...and their generals had taught them that a soldier should be rough to look on, not adorned with gold and silver but putting his trust in iron and in courage : indeed those other things were more truly spoil than arms, shinning bright before a battle, but losing their beauty in the midst of blood and wounds; manhood they said, was the adornment of a solder; all those other things went with the victory, and a rich enemy was the prize of the victor, however poor." (Book IX, xl.4-6)

"In truth the matter is simply, Quirites, that we must always be first denied, and yet have our way in the end. A struggle is all that the patricians ask: they care not what may be the outcome of the struggle." (Book X, viii.11-12)

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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good narration

this audiobook is well narrated. the content is enjoyable to listening. the translation is fluent and clear clear.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Terrible performance

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I wish somebody else would be reader of Greek and Roman literature and ancient history. Charlton Griffin is terrible

What did you like best about this story?

It is a classics. Enough said.

What didn’t you like about Charlton Griffin’s performance?

He does with great consequence mispronounce almost all Roman terms and names. Considering how many titles he is reader of it is astonishing that he has not learned something so fundamental

1 of 6 people found this review helpful