The Feud

Vladimir Nabokov, Edmund Wilson, and the End of a Beautiful Friendship
By: Alex Beam
Narrated by: Douglas Pullar
Length: 5 hrs and 42 mins
4.3 out of 5 stars (12 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

In 1940 Edmund Wilson was the undisputed big dog of American letters. Vladimir Nabokov was a near-penniless Russian exile seeking asylum in the States. Wilson became a mentor to Nabokov, introducing him to every editor of note, assigning to him book reviews for the New Republic, engineering a Guggenheim. Their intimate friendship blossomed over a shared interest in all things Russian, ruffled a bit by political disagreements. But then came Lolita, and suddenly Nabokov was the big (and very rich) dog. Finally the feud erupted in full when Nabokov published his hugely footnoted and virtually unreadable literal translation of Pushkin's famously untranslatable verse novel Eugene Onegin. Wilson attacked his friend's translation with hammer and tong in The New York Review of Books. Nabokov counterattacked in the same publication. Back and forth the increasingly aggressive letters volleyed until their friendship was reduced to ashes by the narcissism of small differences.

©2016 Alex Beam (P)2016 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"A fascinating behind-the-scenes glimpse, full of anecdotal ephemera, of how Wilson and Nabokov interacted and why." (Publishers Weekly)

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Narrator Skips Interesting Notes at Bottom of Page

A fine book, but why does the narrator skip over the interesting notes that sometimes appear at the bottoms of pages? I don't understand. You should at least warn customers about this problem. The reading is not "unabridged."

2 people found this helpful