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The End of Power

From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being in Charge Isn't What It Used to Be
Narrated by: Moises Naim, Don Hagen
Length: 11 hrs and 38 mins
4 out of 5 stars (394 ratings)

Regular price: $20.29

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Publisher's Summary

Power is shifting - from large, stable armies to loose bands of insurgents, from corporate leviathans to nimble start-ups, and from presidential palaces to public squares. But power is also changing, becoming harder to use and easier to lose. As a result, argues award-winning columnist and former Foreign Policy editor Moisés Naím, all leaders have less power than their predecessors, and the potential for upheaval is unprecedented. In The End of Power, Naím illuminates the struggle between once-dominant megaplayers and the new micropowers challenging them in every field of human endeavor. The antiestablishment drive of micropowers can topple tyrants, dislodge monopolies, and open remarkable new opportunities, but it can also lead to chaos and paralysis. Drawing on provocative, original research and a lifetime of experience in global affairs, Naím explains how the end of power is reconfiguring our world.

©2013 Moises Naim (P)2013 Gildan Media LLC

Critic Reviews

"Naím produces a fascinating account of the way states, corporations and traditional interest groups are finding it harder to defend their redoubts.... (He) makes his case with eloquence." ( Financial Times)
"Having served as editor-in-chief of Foreign Policy and the executive director of the World Bank, Naím knows better than most what power on a global scale looks like.... [A] timely, insightful, and eloquent message.” ( Publishers Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • DP
  • 03-07-19

Narrator put me to sleep.

The content might be worthwhile, but I have no idea. I’ve been listening to it for three hours and not retaining a bit because the narrator has literally put me to sleep.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

A bit overkill

Extremely interesting concepts explained ad nauseum with far too much data. Perhaps a better read on paper back for easier skimming.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Painful

This book was painfully mind numbing. A waste of money and time. Great topic but story lost in meaningless dribble.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Here are a bunch of facts from ny times articles

Wow - very overrated book. Bloated overkill of some obvious points. Really felt like it was just throwing a bunch of facts and anecdotes at a wall.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Very informative

Very interesting book on the various aspects of power and how they’ve shifted, using lots of relevant real world examples. I’ll probably read this again someday.

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Must read for leaders

This book points out the structural changes in power that are happening and will continue to happen in the coming decades, and articulated in a very thoughtful way the challenges in governance that every organization, government, society and company will face.

Anybody in a leadership position needs to read this to approach the future in a much more strategic way.

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Interesting topic but...

reads like a textbook. The author spends the majority of the time proving his theory through other research and world events and only one chapter talking about what comes after. I understand that I should not just take his word that his theory is correct and he should attempt to prove it, but I felt like the book beat a dead horse after a while. ok you're right let's move on, but apparently there isn't much thought put into after. Still there topic was interesting but the writing style and presentation was boring and long winded at times.

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Takes too long to get to “So What”

Most of the book is a collection of research findings on where power is declining. Only the very last chapter was insightful on the “so what”

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Interesting take on the way power has evolved

Any additional comments?

A provocative social science book examining what power is and how it has been decaying and becoming more diffuse in modern society. Especially interesting given the American political landscape of gridlock, extreme interest groups, super-PACs, and governmental inefficiency. Naím persuasively and thoughtfully argues his premise, that power has decayed, that even the most powerful individuals and entities are wielding their power less expansively and for shorter periods of time, than at any time in history. His examples throughout the book -- from the ever-shortening tenures of top CEOs, to fringe interest groups making governments "vetocracies", to the competition from charismatic Christian sects to the Catholic Church, to the lowered barriers for entry into a number of businesses -- offer a great deal of food for thought. Naím also mentions Francis Fukuyama's book (Political Order and Political Decay) and that book, combined with this one, is an excellent primer for some of what ails the workings of government. Even if you leave not entirely convinced, the logic and observations alone are helpful.

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Good theory but redundant

The idea itself is good. But the book is so redundant.

The whole theory is that power acquisition and preservation is different nowadays because of internet, globalization, and easy access to knowledge. It's easier to get access power but also easy to lose it.

The book repeats some ideas several ideas which makes it so boring. I wish he summarized his ideas better.

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  • Milad
  • 05-09-19

Interesting

This book is well written and explore a very interesting topic. However, it repeats itself to a point that was difficult to finish it.

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  • J. Lagrange
  • 12-21-18

Great book, well documented, unnecessarily long

I believe Naim makes a good point on how power is becoming more ephemeral. However he makes this point very early on, provides a good framework on how to measure power in subsequent chapters and then basically exemplifies this thesis for 75% of the book. Very well documented and kudos to Naim, but if you read a shorter version, you will get the idea.

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  • Kate
  • 04-21-15

Could have said it in 15 mins lots of repetition.

interesting point but way to drawn out
I wouldn't recommend it to others as there was no real story just examples.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful