• The End of Ice

  • Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption
  • By: Dahr Jamail
  • Narrated by: Tom Parks
  • Length: 7 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: Science & Engineering, Science
  • 4.4 out of 5 stars (352 ratings)
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Publisher's Summary

The author who Jeremy Scahill calls the “quintessential unembedded reporter” visits “hot spots” around the world in a global quest to discover how we will cope with our planet’s changing ecosystems

After nearly a decade overseas as a war reporter, the acclaimed journalist Dahr Jamail returned to America to renew his passion for mountaineering, only to find that the slopes he had once climbed have been irrevocably changed by climate disruption. In response, Jamail embarks on a journey to the geographical front lines of this crisis - from Alaska to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, via the Amazon rainforest - in order to discover the consequences to nature and to humans of the loss of ice.

In The End of Ice, we follow Jamail as he scales Denali, the highest peak in North America, dives in the warm crystal waters of the Pacific only to find ghostly coral reefs, and explores the tundra of St. Paul Island where he meets the last subsistence seal hunters of the Bering Sea and witnesses its melting glaciers. Accompanied by climate scientists and people whose families have fished, farmed, and lived in the areas he visits for centuries, Jamail begins to accept the fact that Earth, most likely, is in a hospice situation. Ironically, this allows him to renew his passion for the planet’s wild places, cherishing Earth in a way he has never been able to before.

Like no other book, The End of Ice offers a firsthand chronicle of the catastrophic reality of our situation and the incalculable necessity of relishing this vulnerable, fragile planet while we still can.

©2019 Dahr Jamail (P)2018 Brilliance Publishing, Inc. Published by arrangement with The New Press (www.thenewpress.com).

What listeners say about The End of Ice

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  • Overall
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Dealing with the Ultimate Climate Change Question

Several years ago Dahr began issuing a monthly newsletter highlighting recent reports and research that showed the effects of climate change. The reports continually became more dire. Now, in this book, Dahr takes us to some of the places most disrupted by this change. And, as always, his reports ring of reality and truth as he describes the surroundings and interviews the scientists who are recording and researching the changes. This makes this book an important contribution to climate change literature.

But, the book goes beyond just reporting what is happening. Two recent reports – one by the UN, one by the Trump Administration – conclude that we have 12 years, possibly fewer, to get greenhouse emissions under control. If we don’t the future looks very bleak. After examining the recent research and the current political situation Dahr realistically decides that our chances of preserving a livable climate is almost nil. So how do we deal with the probability that our we, our children and grandchildren will live in a world far less hospitable to our species? Dahr considers the situation and offers an answer. This is what makes this book so important.

35 people found this helpful

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End of Ice - The beginning of the end of Life.

The author and orator of the End of Ice brings together all of the elements of a changing biosphere in a most unique way. He conveys to the listeners a life time of personal witness of the evidence of the changing climatic conditions that will impact the balance of all life on this planet. He also provides a unique way that allows the reader to cope with the knowledge of what is to come. End of Ice confirms my suspicions and observations. Thank you.

12 people found this helpful

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Ok introduction to abrupt climate change

This book was rich in antidotes but poor in detailed scientific information and analysis. It's an ok introduction to the topic of abrupt climate change, but didn't tell me anything I didn't already know about the big picture.

20 people found this helpful

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A Must Read!

Beautifully written, I loved the mountaineers perspective he gives, the beautiful descriptions of the places he visits and the natural world that inspires him. The story is tragic however and speaks of humanities ultimate extinction based upon the trajectory we are currently on. Even if we stopped producing Co2 emissions today, he writes, it is too late to halt or change the forces that have been set in motion which may well be worse and more far reaching than we have any idea.

1 person found this helpful

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Mourning the Death of the World

Jamail has even less hope for mankind's survival against anthropogenic climate disruption than Wallace-Wells and McKibben in their latest books. But what makes this book bearable is his love for mountain climbing, snorkeling, and chatting with Aboriginal people. He believes the world can't be saved, so while it's still here, it should be loved and cared for, as one would care for a dying relative. He makes a strong case for the inevitability of the loss of all life on Earth. Without drawdown of greenhouse gasses, he's right. To me, omitting that's the books one big flaw. But he does a great job of convincing us the planet is doomed and needs to be mourned.

1 person found this helpful

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An Easy, But Ultimately Sad Tale of Climate Change

The End of Ice is an easy, informative listen or read about climate change that focuses on impacts already manifest, already recorded and measured, the stories of persons now living and the stories about lives already claimed. The author meets with experts and sometimes local residents around the globe to witness and learn about what effects climate change has already etched into the landscape and seascape and to learn and share with us vivid projections of what is to come if, as appears likely, we continue on the same course. Excellent listen or read.

15 people found this helpful

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Excellent

Outstanding description of climate collapse. Real, truthful, heartfelt.

I would add that the economic model that caused this horrific circumstance was and is not the doing of the common people but a sociopathic white wealthy American class driven on greed and deception to maintain their greed. Their model was the only model available for the majority. Yet this unconscionable colluding elite class knew early in the 20th century that their petroleum economic model would destroy our climate and world.

17 people found this helpful

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Not worth it

A waste of time for anyone who already knows about the effects of climate change.

26 people found this helpful

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Beautiful book

This book is like a song,lyrical and tragic, thank you DahrJamail we need this message

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  • zu
  • 03-25-21

Excellent book about the sad state of the earth...

As we deal with climate disruption, it’s scary to listen to the truth. It is also full of wisdom.

Thank you for this book. I grieve for what we humans have done and continue to do to the earth.