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The Emergence of a World Religion

Theosophical Classics
Narrated by: Sandra Brautigam
Length: 40 mins
2.5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Annie Besant was a writer, lecturer, prominent Theosophist, and women's rights activist of her time. She was a frequent contributor to various Theosophical publications of her day. This particular piece was a lecture delivered to the League of Liberal Christianity at Manchester in May of 1911, regarding a global awakening of consciousness that she felt she was witnessing at the time.

©2014 Lamp of Trismegistus (P)2015 Lamp of Trismegistus

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a compelling discussion of one religion to rule them all...

This short listen follows the author's prediction of large scale world religions inevitably merging into a singularly accepted global state of religious knowledge. Besant pointedly argues that simple truths behind founding religions (science, beauty, power of state, individualism, etc) have each contributed towards the globalization of a religious consciousness, only capable of existing in today's world of instant mass communication. Not to neglect the valued contributions of each historically recognized religion, Besant persuades that multiplicity and tolerance are essential harmonizing catalysts towards the new world religion.

Besant provides a persuasive narrative citing key historical examples in conjunction with scientific evidence. However, the discussion feels flat without the other side of the argument. Brautigam's performance of the piece was cleanly done with excellent interpretation of the author's perspective. Recommended for adult public and academic audiences interested in emerging philosophy of religion commentary.