Your audiobook is waiting…

The Easy Anti-Inflammatory Diet for Beginners

A No-Stress Meal Plan with Easy Recipes to Heal the Immune System
Narrated by: Kip Ferguson
Length: 3 hrs and 4 mins
5 out of 5 stars (142 ratings)

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

Sometimes, when something goes wrong in your body, you notice it right away. But other times, the damage occurs unnoticed for a long time and can show up as a host of other problems. Take for instance the variety of inflammatory diseases like arthritis and asthma. Even cancer is a symptom of something else going on in your body. This “something” is often connected with chronic inflammation occurring in your body. 

Inflammation is not always a “bad guy”. Sometimes, you need it in order to protect and heal your body. Like when you broke that bone; the pain signals your body that something is wrong. The swelling and redness indicate that blood is rushing to area and fluid is leaking into the tissue to cushion the broken bone. But what happens when inflammation goes “wrong”?

Chronic inflammation means your body is inflamed all the time and begins to think your own body is the problem. It begins to attack your healthy tissue and cells in an attempt to “heal” it. When this happens, more problems arise. Things like type-2 diabetes and heart disease, for example, are results of chronic inflammation many times. The challenge with chronic inflammation is that you may not realize it is happening right away. You may not see the swelling or redness or may dismiss it as nothing serious. You may also treat a symptom of chronic inflammation without realizing what it really is. Unfortunately, treating the symptoms alone are not going to reduce the inflammation wrecking havoc on your body. You need to treat the source of the problem: the inflammation itself.

Treating inflammation is not an easy task; it requires a slow process of healing your body and bringing it back to the balance that it craves. It is made even more difficult by the pressures and habits of Western culture. Eating foods that aggravate inflammation are only making the situation worse, and you have probably been doing this for years! These foods you are choosing are probably making the symptoms and results of chronic inflammation worse and worse. But when you change it up and choose foods that will fight inflammation instead, you can start finding your way back to health. 

This lifestyle is not just about losing weight or looking good, although those are often side effects; it is more about healing your body and being healthy. Just remember, it is a lifestyle, and it does take time to reverse the years of damage chronic inflammation has caused. Be patient with yourself! You are doing the right thing now in supporting your health. Remember that each time you make that decision to reach for something anti-inflammatory rather than your old habits.

The more you understand the power of the foods that you put in your body, the better. And the more you discover how to stock your kitchen and plan out meals, the more empowered you become. 

©2019 Susan Johnson (P)2019 Susan Johnson

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    142
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    141
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    141
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

One of the best books I own!

The recipes are easy to follow, ingredients are readily available, and the food is very tasty. There is lots of food for thought if you are having health issues. The recipes in the book are delicious and easy to prepare. Good book!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great book

I love how the recipes are easy to follow and simple. This is a great book for someone who is new to this type of diet

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

The Anti-Infammatory Diet & Action Plans

Excellent book- great recipes it’s only been a short while but I'm feeling better already. I've made at least a dozen of the recipes so far, and they've all become family favorites.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

The Dos And Don’ts Of diet

A large number of people live with chronic pain. For many, neural (nerve) blocks aren't the answer, and treatment with medications may have undesired side effects. Following an anti-inflammatory diet is powerful therapy for pain control with many beneficial side effects. The anti-inflammatory diet is considered an integrative approach to pain management, along with exercise, stress management, osteopathic manipulation therapy and acupuncture.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Trail mix

It is easy to make trail mix at home by mixing together nuts and seeds.

This is a versatile snack because people can mix different types of nuts and seeds together depending on their prefrences.

Nuts and seeds are high in omega-3, protein, and healthful fats. Try adding goji berries, which are high in vitamin C.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Matcha smoothie bowl

Matcha is a green tea powder. Many people use it to make tea, lattes, or tasty smoothie bowls.

Like other green teas and black tea, matcha is high in a polyphenol called epigallocatechin (EGCG). These compounds provide anti-inflammatory benefits.

Matcha is available through most tea specialists, Asian grocers, or online.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Turmeric nachos

Making nachos at home can be a more healthful and more nutritious alternative to store-bought options.

These nachos are high in turmeric, which can help reduce inflammation.

They also contain almond meal, making them a good source of antioxidant vitamin E.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Yogurt

A small pot of yogurt or probiotic delivers beneficial bacteria to the gut. A healthy gut microbiome is essential to reduce leaky gut and inflammation.

Yogurt also contains plenty of calcium and protein, which are essential nutrients to keep the body healthy.

Add this versatile food to cereals, fruits, or berries for a more substantial snack.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Chia seed pudding

Chia seed pudding is quick to prepare and makes a great, filling snack or dessert.

Chia seeds are a great source of omega-3, plant-based protein, and fiber.

These puddings are incredibly versatile. Choose a favorite fruit to go with it. Use a dairy-free yogurt, such as coconut yogurt to make it vegan.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Power balls

Power balls are an easy snack to make. The sesame seeds are an excellent source of omega-3s.

This versatile snack provides both nutrients and energy, and makes an ideal, healthful pick-me-up to eat during the day.

Power balls are gluten-free and dairy-free and make great lunchtime or school snacks.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Ramim Khan
  • 07-16-19

Things You Didn’t Know about diet

Immune system cells that cause inflammation contribute to the buildup of fatty deposits in the lining of the heart’s arteries. These plaques can eventually rupture, which causes a clot to form that could potentially block an artery. When blockage happens, the result is a heart attack.
The most common way to measure inflammation is to conduct a blood test for C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), which is a marker of inflammation. Doctors also measure homocysteine levels to evaluate chronic inflammation. Finally, physicians test for HbA1C — a measurement of blood sugar — to assess damage to red blood cells.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Asik Khan
  • 07-16-19

The Essential Guide To diet

Early symptoms of chronic inflammation may be vague, with subtle signs and symptoms that may go undetected for a long period. You may just feel slightly fatigued, or even normal. As inflammation progresses, however, it begins to damage your arteries, organs and joints. Left unchecked, it can contribute to chronic diseases, such as heart disease, blood vessel disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sohag Molla
  • 07-16-19

The Practical Guide To diet

An inflammatory response can also occur when the immune system goes into action without an injury or infection to fight. Since there’s nothing to heal, the immune system cells that normally protect us begin to destroy healthy arteries, organs and joints.
“When you don’t eat right, don’t get enough exercise and have too much stress, the body responds by triggering inflammation,” says James Gray, MD, a cardiologist at the Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine. “Chronic inflammation can have damaging consequences over the long term. So, the food you eat, the quality of sleep you get and how much you exercise, they all really matter when it comes to reducing inflammation.”

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Kamrul Molla
  • 07-16-19

The Ultimate Guide To diet

Eat more healthy unsaturated fats and fewer saturated fats. Choose olive oil, grapeseed oil, corn oil, canola oil, avocado oil, nuts, seeds, avocados, olives and other healthy plant-based fats more than fats like butter and coconut oil. Avoid trans fats, found in processed foods made with partially hydrogenated oils, completely.
Use extra-virgin olive oil or canola oil for cooking. Choose organic canola oil if you are concerned about GMOs. Incorporate foods like avocados, walnuts, cashews and almonds for a good dose of your daily healthy fats. Eat foods that are high in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon, sardines, herring, black cod, hemp seeds and flaxseeds. Aim to eat fish twice a week.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sihab Khan
  • 07-16-19

The Ultimate Cheat Sheet On diet

An anti-inflammatory diet is very similar to the Mediterranean Diet—both diets have a strong emphasis on eating fresh foods and healthy fats. It includes foods that are high in antioxidants, like fresh fruits and vegetables, and avoids foods that are known to cause inflammation, such as highly processed or deep-fried foods and convenience or fast foods.

You don't need to count calories on an anti-inflammatory diet. The focus of the anti-inflammatory diet is to balance your macronutrients from carbs, protein and fats. An anti-inflammatory diet should include 40 to 50 percent of calories from carbohydrates, 30 percent of calories from fat, and 20 to 30 percent of calories from protein. You can estimate your macronutrient intake in trackers like MyFitnessPal and Lose It!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Siam Khan
  • 07-16-19

The Complete Guide To diet

The idea first came about when Dr. Perricone was in medical school studying cancer cells. "I noticed there was inflammation present because of pathology, but I also saw inflammation in aged skin versus youthful skin," he explains. "I realized that regardless of where a disease originated, regardless of its cause, anti-inflammatories often solved the problem, or at least diminished the symptoms." He began to wonder whether an anti-inflammatory diet could have a similar effect. "I'm also a nutritionist, so I looked at food, and saw that food can cause inflammation," he says. So he began to develop a diet that would reduce inflammation in the body, which he hypothesized would also help improve your skin.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Suman Khan
  • 07-16-19

The Definitive Checklist For diet

The anti-inflammatory diet, and lifestyle management in general, provides an important method of reducing the levels of pain. Importantly, this approach to pain management is without any negative side effects. Unpleasant side effects of some medications, including fogginess, memory loss and sleepiness, are no longer a problem.

Nutrition that supports a diet rich in anti-inflammatory foods is another approach to chronic pain management. The anti-inflammatory diet is a lynchpin of such an integrative approach. Although there are no magic foods, putting the right combination of foods into your diet can produce remarkable results.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sumon Molla
  • 07-16-19

The Complete Library Of diet

Inflammation is a natural process in the body that provides a defense against disease. Chronic inflammation can lead to heart disease and strokes, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and even depression. Exercise, stress management and a proper diet are lifestyle approaches for managing the problems associated with inflammation and chronic pain.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Robiul Molla
  • 07-15-19

Lentil, beetroot, and hazelnut salad

Lentil salads are a simple, protein-rich lunchtime option for people on a vegetarian diet.

Lentils and beetroot increase the fiber content, while the hazelnuts provide extra protein and vitamin E. Vitamin E is an antioxidant.

Beetroots contain high amounts of a compound called betaine. Betaine is an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jafor Molla
  • 07-15-19

Quinoa and citrus salad

A quinoa and citrus fruit salad is gluten-free and great for people on a vegan diet. Quinoa contains lots of protein and nutrients.

Add citrus fruits, such as lemon, lime, or grapefruit, to the salad for an antioxidant boost. Citrus fruits are full of vitamin C, which is an important antioxidant that can also help renew other antioxidants in the body.

Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron from plant-based sources, such as spinach and quinoa.