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Publisher's Summary

For 17-year-old Delk Sinclair, studying abroad in Ireland means one thing: escape. Delk is tired of hearing about her friends' debutante parties, watching her pregnant stepmother redecorate her mother's house, and having to smile sweetly, even though she doesn't think she'll ever get over losing her mother.

Ireland is Delk's chance to be happy. With the stunning green landscape as backdrop, Delk revels in all things Irish, from living in a real Irish castle, to celebrating St. Paddy's Day in Galway, to enjoying Irish music and dance, to studying Yeats and shearing a sheep!

When Delk begins to fall for a very handsome Irishman, she wonders if there's even more to the Emerald Isle than it first seemed. It is fun, to be sure, but will those smiling Irish eyes really be able to heal her broken heart?

©2008 Suzanne Supplee; (P)2008 Penguin

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Mediocre in Every Way.

Any additional comments?

A protagonist without any real goal except to not be at home. Likewise, the scenes rarely have goals and often seem a bit pointless. No real sense of chemistry between the protagonist and her love interest. A narrator who apparently crafted her southern accent by watching "Gone With the Wind" too many times and then channeling Golden Girls' Blanche Devereaux. While her Irish accent is great, the protagonist's southern drawl is laughable, distracting and ridiculous as the voice of a present-day teenager from Nashville. And a writer who learned "tell don't show," not "show don't tell." The book is just five hours long and I don't think I can bear to finish it.