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Publisher's Summary

Miles Halter is fascinated by famous last words - and tired of his safe life at home. He leaves for boarding school to seek what the dying poet Francois Rabelais called the "Great Perhaps." Much awaits Miles at Culver Creek, including Alaska Young. Clever, funny, screwed-up, and dead sexy, Alaska will pull Miles into her labyrinth and catapult him into the Great Perhaps.

Looking for Alaska brilliantly chronicles the indelible impact one life can have on another. A stunning debut, it marks John Green's arrival as an important new voice in contemporary fiction.

(P)2006 Brilliance Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    2,496
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    1,890
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    809
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    171
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    79

Performance

  • 4.4 out of 5.0
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    1,529
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    502
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    81
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    49

Story

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
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    200
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  • Story

Loved it!

I would highly recommend this book to all my friends. The witty banter mixed with the dramatic turn of events and resolutions all flowed smoothly and wrapped up beautifully.

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Nerd finds flawed love in John Green book. Shock!

I generally like John Green as a human. And he's a good storyteller, so his books are pleasant reads. And they all are pretty much the same story with different artifacts. That's why the only reason that I bought and read this book is because it's one of the most banned books in the country and buying (plus reading) a banned book is your way to give the middle finger to the world's idiots.

That said, there's a structure to a John Green book that would make an interesting year's work for a psychoanalyst I'm sure. Nerd boy with unique talents has nerdy friends. In high school or college said boy will interact with a bright, beautiful, insightful, funny, incredibly troubled female. Things happen. She dies. It's not even like it's a spoiler anymore. It's like saying "Sherlock Holmes will solve the crime." It's the details and filigrees that Green strews through the story that make it an entertaining read. You're not going to be knocked off your feet by a Gone Girl twist.

In this case the girl is Alaska, whose parents allowed her to name herself at a certain age. She's bright, beautiful, insightful, funny, and incredibly troubled.

What makes Green readable is fun dialogue and enough differences in specifics to make this particular alternate Green universe novel interesting in its particulars. The love interests will always have an aura of mystery. Alaska is no exception. Working out the details of that mystery really does make Green like a Conan Doyle or Christie in working a new mystery into familiar surroundings. Sure it's not a locked-door murder but working through the threads of a troubled girl's psyche is worth an afternoon of reading at minimum.

I can say that I see why this is a banned book more clearly than I could with, say, Fahrenheit 451 or Huckleberry Finn. There are various sex acts, copious drinking, ribald adventures. I get it. If you homeschool in a mountain cabin with no nearby neighbors or internet access then you should probably ban this book from your "school". There will be plenty of time when your child escapes your brain prison for them to seek out and find all the evil writing they want in adulthood. For most high schoolers of my current acquaintance this book will be mild compared to whatever is happening in their personal lives and might actually add some sensitivity and perspective to their interactions. Put it in the library with a parental permission requirement but put it in the damn library. Meanwhile I'll keep looking for books being banned and congratulate the writer with the royalty from another purchase.

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contrived teen pseudo drama

nothing rings true in green's novel about teenage loss and coming of age. His protagonist Pudge, bounces between socratic poet philosopher and bumbling, clueless teen without even enough sense to Google something.

Green is obviously targeting the high school required reading lists to bolster his book sales, as he inserts just enough controversy to rile up the parents and make old librarians feel 'counter culture' and in tune with this generation. but don't buy it. the story is weak and never rings true to anyone who grew up within a decade of the characters or who actually had similar life experiences. stick to the Fault in your stars if you want to enjoy Green's storytelling ability.

  • Overall

Looking for Alaska

It was sad and I really liked this book it is a banned bookwas that fair

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Not impressed

Everything seem so cliche. I read the fault in our stars, which I did enjoy, so I wanted to try another book from Green's collection. Sadly, this book doesn't compare. This has to be one of his first books, before all the kinks were rolled out.

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I heard it all in one day

The book is well performed, down to the distinct voices the reader gives to every character. It starts a bit slow but I promise that if you hear it to at least a third of the way through you'll have to hear it all, and I promise you won't be disappointed.

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A must!!

Such a great book! I recommend for ages 14-15 and older. For there is some mature language and content. Aside from that... it definitely is a must. You won't be able to quit!

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Amazing reader

The reader of this book was exceptional, modifying his speech to give each character their own quirky voice.
It was quite the act.

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It is a great book

I enjoyed this book so much and was so surprised to go trough it all so fast! That is how good it is.
"We can never be irreparable broken"

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I didn't finish it

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

No, I didn't enjoy the book...due to the performance, it makes me hard to get into the story, or makes me rather dislike the character Alaska, very much. I feel if I read this book personally, I wouldn't dislike it this much, but I can't finish it, just the thought of that I have to listen to Alaska speak again. Male characters performance are fine, only the female characters way of talking seems very much self centered and fake.