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Publisher's Summary

A timely, crucial, and empowering exploration of racism - and antiracism - in America

This is NOT a history book.
This is a book about the here and now.
A book to help us better understand why we are where we are.
A book about race.

The construct of race has always been used to gain and keep power, to create dynamics that separate and silence. This remarkable reimagining of Dr. Ibram X. Kendi's National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Beginning reveals the history of racist ideas in America, and inspires hope for an antiracist future. It takes you on a race journey from then to now, shows you why we feel how we feel, and why the poison of racism lingers. It also proves that while racist ideas have always been easy to fabricate and distribute, they can also be discredited. 

Through a gripping, fast-paced, and energizing narrative written by beloved award-winner Jason Reynolds, this book shines a light on the many insidious forms of racist ideas - and on ways listeners can identify and stamp out racist thoughts in their daily lives.

©2020 Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi (P)2020 Little, Brown Young Readers

Critic Reviews

An "engrossing and relentless intellectual history of prejudice in America...The greatest service Kendi [provides] is the ruthless prosecution of American ideas about race for their tensions, contradictions and unintended consequences." (Washington Post)

What listeners say about Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You

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You can't fight what you don't know-Jason Reynolds

I'm a 54 yr old white woman. After reading How to be an Antiracist by Ibram X Kendi I wanted to read this book before I read Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X Kendi because I know that there is so much I don't know. White privilege has given me that luxury. I am trying to strip it away. I recommend this and all the books I've mentioned here as a comprehensive place to start.

20 people found this helpful

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Informative but not clinical

The book is an easy listen. The vernacular of the book and the cadence of the narrator made listening to this book like sitting in my living room listening to my dad, uncles, cousins, and friends discuss the history systemic racism. I would recommend this book to readers of from middle school and up. Those new on their journey of understanding all and those a firmly on their journey still seeking to fill in holes of how certain things came to be. I laughed, cringed, amen'd, teared up, smiled and so forth. Definitely a book I shall recommend.

16 people found this helpful

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Best Not History, History book I have ever read!

I read this book in one day and then added it to my curriculum. This book provides a funny, relatable, refreshing, clear view on historical events that have impacted racism and the racist ideologies that are deeply engrained in American and European history. I loved the humor and the tactful and graceful telling of the truth and the lives of those who championed against racism in different ways. It is comprehensive and real. 5 stars!

12 people found this helpful

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Incredible. You MUST listen to this. Get learnt.

"Hatred has a way of convincing us half-love is whole." The best, best "history" book I have ever had the honor of listening to. Thank you. I feel inspired to fight the good fight.

10 people found this helpful

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Exceptional!!!

Listening to JR deliver the in-depth "nonhistory" lesson was such a great experience. I'm pretty sure I didn't see my family for hours as I breathed in every word. I learned about black people who loved this land and this life and wanted the same things as we all do; peace of mind and the freedom to live and love as we choose without judgement or biases based on brown skin; black skin; white skin. The narrative depicted in the novel is entertaining and forthright; delivered by tenacious and thought provoking writers this is a must read for all people; not just those of color. I look forward to sharing this work with my students and colleagues.

9 people found this helpful

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this book should be in every history class

I'm looking into getting a class set. The engaging and truthful way you tell this story will draw out students into real and in-depth discussions around race. Thank you for writing this!

8 people found this helpful

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Interesting book, notable statistical fallacy

Interesting book, but Kendi states a statistical fallacy in the introduction. "Black people are 5x more likely to be incarcerated than whites, I'm no math wiz, but if black people make up 13% of the US population, then black people should make up somewhere close to 13% of American's sitting in prisons." Because the US population is comprised of ~13% of blacks, that does not mean that black people should make up ~13% of American's sitting in prisons. See the following excerpt from chapter four in Discrimination and Disparities by Thomas Sowell to understand why. "Crime Statistics and Arrest Statistics - Some of the most gross distortions of reality through errors of omission have involved quite simple omissions. No one needs to be an expert on the complexities of statistical analysis in order to see through many statistical fallacies, including those based on simple omissions. But it does require stopping to think about the numbers, instead of being swept along by a combination of rhetoric and statistics. Statistics cited in support of claims that the police target blacks for arrests usually go no further than showing that the proportion of black people arrested greatly exceeds the roughly 13 percent of the American population who are black. If anyone were to use similar reasoning to claim that National Basketball Association (NBA) referees were racially biased, because the proportion of fouls that referees call against black players in the NBA greatly exceeds 13 percent, anyone familiar with the NBA would immediately see the fallacy—because the proportion of black players in the NBA greatly exceeds the proportion of blacks in the American population. Moreover, since blacks are especially over-represented among the star players in the NBA, the actual playing time of black players on the basketball court would be even more disproportionately higher, since it is the players on the court who get cited for fouls more so than secondary players sitting on the bench. What would be relevant to testing the hypothesis that blacks are disproportionately targeted for arrest by the police, or disproportionately convicted and sentenced by courts, would be objective data on the proportions of particular violations of the law committed by blacks, compared to the proportions of blacks arrested, convicted and sentenced for those particular violations. Such objective data are not always easy to come by, since data reflecting actions by the police would hardly be considered valid as a test of whether the actions of the police were warranted. However, there are some particular statistics that are both relevant and independent of the actions of the police. The most reliable and objective crime statistics are statistics on homicides, since a dead body can hardly be ignored, regardless of the race of the victim. For as long as homicide statistics have been kept in the United States, the proportion of homicide victims who are black has been some multiple of the proportion of blacks in the population. Moreover, the vast majority of those homicide victims whose killers have been identified were killed by other blacks, just as most white homicide victims were killed by other whites. Since the homicide rate among blacks is some multiple of the homicide rate among whites, it is hardly surprising that the arrest rate of blacks for homicide is also some multiple of the rate of homicide arrests among whites. What is relevant in such statistical comparisons is not the proportion of blacks in the general population, but the proportion of blacks among people who commit a particular crime." Once again, interesting book. But I would encourage Kendi and Reynolds to read Discrimination and Disparities by Thomas Sowell and ultimately remove this statistical fallacy from their book.

6 people found this helpful

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Prepare to be shaken!

A jarring look at racism: Its history and prevalence in today's world. Jason Reynolds is amazing. Listening to the Audible version is the best way to "read" the book. Now I'll go back and mark passages I want to share!

5 people found this helpful

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Excellence

Phenomenal, informative, enlightening. Narrator was excellent and real. He made me want to listen

5 people found this helpful

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Wow!

A must read for every human being. The reading of the text by Reynolds is phenomenal. The facts are presented in a way that is easy to understand, especially for younger readers. The way to in which the text is organized adds to its impact and readability. Empowering, thought-provoking, maddening and uplifting. If you no longer want to walk around with blinders, please read.

4 people found this helpful

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  • Emma Hart
  • 08-16-20

A must listen/read

This is a must read/ listen for all people! It makes a topic that can seem tough to wade through or to start learning about accessible to all. It does require listening carefully and at time rewinding to listen again but it is well worth the time. It feel more like a conversation than a lecture. Please please listen to the very end of the acknowledgements. I often don’t listen all the way to the end of the acknowledgements but in this case please do.

3 people found this helpful

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  • star wars
  • 08-02-20

a great introduction

not an easy ready, but the closest you'll get for such a hard topic.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 06-27-20

Explains the seed racism and it's continued growth

really enjoyed the breakdown and the analyst of understanding racism through the ages. Become anti-racist!

1 person found this helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 11-14-20

Superb

What a great book -powerful, compelling, hugely informative and beautifully read. And so important right now

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  • karen
  • 06-29-20

No bookshelf is complete without this

Could not stop listening. Will make my whole family listen to it and insist that my local school incorporate it in their curriculum. This part of history must be told and retold and never be shut down