Regular price: $31.19

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Capitan Daniel Rawson is a soldier, spy, linguist and ladies' man. Whether he is extracting valuable intelligence from the wife of a French general or leading his men in a Forlorn Hope, Rawson is a man on whom the Duke of Marlborough can always rely.

Seething with intrigue and packed with swashbuckling heroics, the novel follows the Confederate army on the long, perilous trek across Europe to meet the French and their allies at the ferocious battle of Blenheim.

The first in an exciting new adventure series featuring Captain Daniel Rawson.

©2009 Edward Marston; (P)2009 Oakhill Publishing Ltd

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 2.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2

Story

  • 2.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1
Sort by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Trite story line.

Would you try another book from Edward Marston and/or Christopher Oxford?

I am going to try Marston's railroad series. If that is at the same level as this book, I'll give him up.

What could Edward Marston have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Reduce its size in half by getting rid of the trite filler. For example: Abigale: Daniel, I don't want you to go on the forlorn hope. Daniel: But Abigale, I am a soldier. Abigale: But you might be killed! Daniel: If I didn't go, it would be like you giving up your beauty!

How could the performance have been better?

The narrator not give Abigale an irritating five year old child's lisp.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

Part 1 started off okay.

Any additional comments?

I gave up in the first ten minutes of Part 2.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Frances
  • Little Rock, Ar, United States
  • 07-28-09

Puzzled

This reader is fine until a woman comes into the story. Then he adopts a whiny falsetto that makes female characters sound like Minnie Mouse or Olive Oyl. It totally destroys the listener's--or at least this listerner's--ability to follow the story. Moreover, it's offensive. He seems to be intentionally making all the women into jibbering idiots. In all audiobooks, we lose some of the wonderful freedom to see the characters strictly through our own imaginations, but the sacrifice is usually well compensated. Jim Dale is wonderful. This is awful.


  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Wadie
  • Santa Ana, CA, United States
  • 04-06-09

A good listen

This wasn't quite as lively as I expected having read the Nicolas Bracewell series by the same author. Once I got used to the pace it became enjoyable. I wasn't sure about the narrator though.
Men can do female voices, and do them well. This narrator made the lead female sound like a total wuss!! She was but still:)

Sort by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • James
  • 06-23-13

Badly written, unlikely plot, badly read.

If this book wasn’t for you, who do you think might enjoy it more?

I cannot think of anyone who would enjoy this book.

Would you ever listen to anything by Edward Marston again?

No

Would you be willing to try another one of Christopher Oxford’s performances?

No, he is the worst reader by far of any audiobook I have listened to.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Soldier of Fortune?

Everything

Any additional comments?

The plot was nonsense; the historical aspect was delivered as though it was part of a non-fiction account of Marlborough's campaign and seemed completely unconnected with the fictional part; the relationship between Marlborough and Daniel Rawson was farcical to the point of unbelievability and Christopher Oxford's rendition of different characters' voices would have been comical if it had not been so intensely annoying.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful