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Publisher's Summary

International best-selling author Bernard Cornwell, an undisputed master of historical fiction, is in top form for the 20th novel in his wildly popular Richard Sharpe series. In the year 1810 Napoleon is determined to conquer Portugal. But Captain Richard Sharpe leads the French directly into the Duke of Wellington’s devastating defenses at Torres Vedras, where one of the great battles of the Napoleonic wars erupts.

©2004 Bernard Cornwell (P)2004 Recorded Books

What listeners say about Sharpe’s Escape

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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The Napoleonic James Bond Lives to Fight Again.

Before James Bond, there was Richard Sharpe. Fighting the King's enemies. Dashing about getting himself into trouble, then pulling out the miraculous escape. And always getting the beautiful girl into his bed. That is our Richard Sharpe.

Bernard Cornwell knows how to write great stories. Yes, they tend to be formulaic, but I love these stories for their sheer bloody enjoyment. The author does an excellent job of building in the actions, patterns, and personalities of the time (as I understand them to be). He also educates you into the military thoughts and concepts of the British army during the Napoleonic Wars in Spain, Portugal, and France. And if the French leaders were are narcissistic as Cornwell suggests, I wonder how they won any battles at all.

The only complaint I have is Patrick Tull as the narrator. I much prefer these stories read by William Gaminara or Frederick Davidson, Tull is not bad and I got used to his accent as the book progressed, but Gaminara and Davidson are better. Personal preference there.

If you like British military history in general, and the Napoleonic Wars in particular, then you will enjoy the Sharpe novels.

4 people found this helpful

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Get the other copy listed on Audible.

Great book and great performance. Definitely listen to this book. I think the other copy may have the historical note at the end though. This one did not. I don't know for sure if there is one, but the Author usually includes one and it's not at the end of this copy of the book.

3 people found this helpful

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Some liberties taken for good story-telling.

And the man's scholar enough to take pride in pointing out the liberties taken. Some of the best action and battle writing scenes, as GRR Martin points out, but the fight with the giant Portuguese criminal, the rights and lefts may've been confused in the telling. One can only wonder why Napoleon didn't employ rifles. And why he never learned that you eventually run out of other people's stuff to take. Too bad. There WAS good reason to be against religion in those days, after centuries of power-mad priesthoods meddling in the affairs of everyone. Religion. Can't live with it. Can't live without it.

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Sharpe Does It Again

Once again Bernard Cornwell’s Sharpe keeps me anxious to the end. This flawed yet gallant brilliant soldier keeps my interest for days... though I enjoy Tull’s reading, his Sharpe seemed to just sound like an aged elderly man instead of the usual “rough around the edges” type. At times he was just reading instead of performing, but we made it through. I’ve never read a war themed novel until reading Saxon Stories Series. My interest was peaked by Uhtred character and made it though the entire series. Soon after I began reading anything I could get my hands on by Cornwell. On to the next!

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Great story, and Patrick Tull is the best!

What made the experience of listening to Sharpe’s Escape the most enjoyable?

To me, Tull's voice and acting skills make the story come alive. Here is no artificially polished public speaker, sounding like a politician or a preacher. Here is a genuine story teller from the past, one who speaks as though he has a rapt audience at his feet on a dark and windy night, room lights off, and a fire crackling. I find it easy to get completely into the narrative, and to live the story myself. Tull's is a rare skill with the spoken word. The Sharpe books are perfect for this style of storytelling, and Sharpe's Escape was a wonderful listen. I have several of the Sharpe books now, selected based on Tull as the narrator.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Sharpe, of course. His character is, while heroic, very realistic. He gets away with a lot of risky moves, but it's believable when he does. Bernard Cornwell's stories appeal strongly to me, and the Sharpe character and stories are great creations.

Have you listened to any of Patrick Tull’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have all the Aubrey/Maturin books from Patrick O'Brian, and I purposely chose Tull as the narrator. If I am undecided about buying a book, Tull as the narrator will swing the decision, and I'll buy it.

Who was the most memorable character of Sharpe’s Escape and why?

It's hard to pick one because Patrick Tull brings them all to life, and each is as enjoyable as any other. Let me just say the all the supporting characters are as carefully drawn and involved in the plot as is the main character, Sharpe. I would favorably compare the Sharpe stories to the Aubrey/Maturin stories, except, for the most part, they're land based.

Any additional comments?

I will buy all the Sharpe books narrated by Patrick Tull first, then (because I enjoy the stories and characters so thoroughly) I'll see if I can get into books from other narrators. It can be difficult to switch narrators when you respond so completely to their storytelling style.