• Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism

  • By: David Harvey
  • Narrated by: James Cameron Stewart
  • Length: 13 hrs and 46 mins
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (41 ratings)

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Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism  By  cover art

Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism

By: David Harvey
Narrated by: James Cameron Stewart
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Publisher's summary

To modern Western society, capitalism is the air we breathe, and most people rarely think to question it, for good or for ill. But knowing what makes capitalism work - and what makes it fail - is crucial to understanding its long-term health and the vast implications for the global economy that go along with it.

In Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism, the eminent scholar David Harvey, author of A Brief History of Neoliberalism, examines the internal contradictions within the flow of capital that have precipitated recent crises. He contends that while the contradictions have made capitalism flexible and resilient, they also contain the seeds of systemic catastrophe. Many of the contradictions are manageable, but some are fatal: the stress on endless compound growth, the necessity to exploit nature to its limits, and tendency toward universal alienation. Capitalism has always managed to extend the outer limits through "spatial fixes", expanding the geography of the system to cover nations and people formerly outside of its range. Whether it can continue to expand is an open question, but Harvey thinks it unlikely in the medium term future: the limits cannot extend much further, and the recent financial crisis is a harbinger of this.

©2014 David Harvey (P)2020 Tantor