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Publisher's Summary

Finalist, 2017 Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction

Finalist, 2017 Speaker's Book Award

Finalist, 2018 B.C. National Award for Canadian Non-fiction

In 1966, 12-year-old Chanie Wenjack froze to death on the railway tracks after running away from residential school. An inquest was called, and four recommendations were made to prevent another tragedy. None of those recommendations were applied.

More than a quarter of a century later, from 2000 to 2011, seven Indigenous high school students died in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The seven were hundreds of miles away from their families, forced to leave home and live in a foreign and unwelcoming city. Five were found dead in the rivers surrounding Lake Superior, below a sacred Indigenous site. Jordan Wabasse, a gentle boy and star hockey player, disappeared into the -20 degrees Celsius night. The body of celebrated artist Norval Morrisseau’s grandson, Kyle, was pulled from a river, as was Curran Strang’s. Robyn Harper died in her boardinghouse hallway, and Paul Panacheese inexplicably collapsed on his kitchen floor. Reggie Bushie’s death finally prompted an inquest, seven years after the discovery of Jethro Anderson, the first boy whose body was found in the water. 

Using a sweeping narrative focusing on the lives of the students, award-winning investigative journalist Tanya Talaga delves into the history of this small northern city that has come to manifest Canada’s long struggle with human rights violations against Indigenous communities.

©2017 Tanya Talaga (P)2018 Anansi Audio

What listeners say about Seven Fallen Feathers

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Important book…

Sad and eye-opening book about the historical and present treatment of indigenous people in Canada. Similar stories have been reported in the US, but the US lags in taking action to address these same issues.

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Incredible

The entire truth and honesty with which this is written is heard wrenching. We should all hear/ read stories and critically think, why, who, and how can we make the world better.

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Reality, too close to home!

Even though I had bought the paperback I chose to listen through Audible. My eyes have been opened & my heart goes out to those that have endured this pain.
Miigwech

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Essential Reading, Listening, Hearing & Doing

If you think our Truth and Reconciliation Act has little to do with your everyday life, listen to this moving book — it’s journalism at its best. If it doesn’t open your eyes, you’re in a coma.