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Publisher's Summary

The "web" has become our most powerful ecological image of the interconnectedness of all creatures, yet this image predates science, it is present in every culture's anthology. Chief Seattle said "Whatever man does to the web, he does to himself." Award-winning journalist Richard Louv explores the fragile network that connects people and the strands that make it up: nature, childhood, adulthood, spirit, purpose, and community. Louv makes a compelling case that our future depends on rebuilding this fragile web of life through strengthening and treasuring our friendships, our business relationships, and our families.

Copyright ©1996 Richard Louv; Copyright (P)1998 NewStar Media Inc.

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Enriching and Uplifting

This was a very warm and fuzzy listen. It will slow you down, give you a different perspective and help you appreciate the important things in your life.

This collection of the author's thoughts shows how life is threaded together by small, yet significant experiences. He shows how strands of his childhood, love, marriage, and parenting give his life its texture. Although you may not relate specifically to his stories of fishing, relocating and aging, you will most certainly identify with the feelings and emotions conveyed in them and how they tie us all together.

Fritjof Capra?s Web of Life was abstract and theoretical, but this is practical and touching. Some passages even brought a tear to my eye.

The narrator had a soothing therapeutic voice but the quality of the sound left a lot to be desired.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful