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Publisher's Summary

Do you live or work around someone who is so focused on their wants and needs that everything and everyone else is invited to take the backseat? Is this person so obnoxious that you want to scream or pull your hair out? Narcissistic personality disorder is a mental illness that causes the sufferer to think so highly of themselves that they can get nearly delusional.

  • How It Feels to Encounter a Narcissist
  • Understanding Narcissism
  • Spotting a Narcissist
  • Dealing with a Narcissist

©2015 Michele Gilbert (P)2015 Michele Gilbert

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helpful

good information but it seem like it wasn't enough. needed a little bit more details on how to deal with things

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Sounds like it's from an issue of Cosmo

This audio-snippet doesn't offer much content of substance (unsurprisingly since it is just over 20 minutes long). Apart from stating that it is tragic for children to have parents with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) there is no real advice here if that's what you were looking for. Instead it is more superficial advice on dealing with colleagues, friends, and romantic partners. From my personal experience I'm not sure that the advice provided would be very successful in severe cases of NPD but it is generally sound advice, if mostly common sense.