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Publisher's Summary

Countless criminals have made their mark on Chicago and the surrounding communities. Chicago Sun-Times journalist Jon Seidel takes listeners back in time to the days when H. H. Holmes lurked in his "Murder Castle" and guys named Al Capone and John Dillinger ruled the underworld. Drawing upon years of reporting, and with special access to the Chicago Daily News and Chicago Sun-Times archives, Jon Seidel explains how men like Nathan Leopold, Richard Loeb, and Richard Speck tried to get away with history’s most disturbing crimes.

©2019 Jon Seidel (P)2019 Jon Seidel

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Nice compendium of Chicago crime

(As posted in GoodReads)
I was already familiar with most of these cases. Certainly, having gotten my bachelors degree at U of C, and having lived in Chicago (Hyde Park) until 67, the Leopold and Loeb and the Richard Speck stories had both been important and discussed during my childhood and college. But this book filled in and clarified a fair amount. I remember as a child seeing a movie about the St. Valentine's Day massacre, and being a Chicagoan I have often had that brought up about my town, but this was kind of the first place that I actually got the details about the situation. There was certainly nothing like actually living on the south side of Chicago during the Richard Speck situation! But, having been a small child at the time, I knew only what my parents (who had both become nervous, at best, during the whole circumstance) and unable to totally clarify what had been going on. I have, subsequently, read more about that, but this book was a good consolidation of all of it. And, also of course, having subscribes to The Daily News (well, my parents subscribed) until it went out of business, I love the connection with that newspaper :-)

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