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Publisher's Summary

Why have we humans always longed to connect with something larger than ourselves? Even today, in our technologically advanced age, more than 70 percent of Americans claim to believe in God. Why, in short, won't God go away? 

In this groundbreaking new book, researchers Andrew Newberg and Eugene d'Aquili offer an explanation that is at once profoundly simple and scientifically precise: The religious impulse is rooted in the biology of the brain. In Why God Won't Go Away, Newberg and d'Aquili document their pioneering explorations in the field of neurotheology, an emerging discipline dedicated to understanding the complex relationship between spirituality and the brain. Blending cutting-edge science with illuminating insights into the nature of consciousness and spirituality, they bridge faith and reason, mysticism and empirical data. The neurological basis of how the brain identifies the "real" is nothing short of miraculous. This fascinating, eye-opening book dares to explore both the miracle and the biology of our enduring relationship with God.

©2001 Andrew Newberg, MD; Epilogue copyright 2002 by Andrew Newberg, MD (P)2018 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"[A] fascinating and thought-provoking book by two neurologists and a veteran journalist... Their arguments are cogent, and their observations and questions should keep readers seriously involved." (Booklist)

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Tripe

Very disappointing. This book is complete sophistry with a conclusion built on wild speculation couched in scientific language.

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