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Publisher's Summary

A New York Times best-selling author explores cutting-edge brain science to learn where talent comes from, how it grows, and how we can make ourselves smarter.

How does a penniless Russian tennis club with one indoor court create more top 20 women players than the entire United States? How did a small town in rural Italy produce the dozens of painters and sculptors who ignited the Italian Renaissance? Why are so many great soccer players from Brazil?

Where does talent come from, and how does it grow?

New research has revealed that myelin, once considered an inert form of insulation for brain cells, may be the holy grail of acquiring skill. Journalist Daniel Coyle spent years investigating talent hotbeds, interviewing world-class practitioners (top soccer players, violinists, fighter, pilots, artists, and bank robbers) and neuroscientists. In clear, accessible language, he presents a solid strategy for skill acquisition - in athletics, fine arts, languages, science or math - that can be successfully applied through a person's entire lifespan.

©2009 Daniel Coyle; (P)2009 HighBridge Company

Critic Reviews

"I only wish I'd never before used the words 'breakthrough' or 'breathtaking' or 'magisterial' or 'stunning achievement' or 'your world will never be the same after you read this book.' Then I could be using them for the first and only time as I describe my reaction to Daniel Coyle's The Talent Code." (Tom Peters)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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Short and sweet

This book explains that time is important towards refining skills but how you train during that time is what matters most. Being busy and being effective are very different outputs. Thank you for your thesis and wisdom.

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Great Book

It's a great read or listen. It was written with tons of case studies. I thought there could of been more clear actionable points through out each chapter. Had there been that, it would be a 5 star book.

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great!

as an instructor, I found this affirming and enlightening. as a student, I really found it interesting as well.

recommended highly!

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Great info, sometimes repetitive and unbalanced

The insights from this author are worth listening to and the storytelling is pretty good--lots of examples and variety! I noticed a lot of repetition in the middle of the book, and an unusually long focus on Kip schools as an example, but overall totally worth the listen!

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  • Sam
  • USA
  • 12-22-16

Some good points, scientificall overinterpreted

I am surrounded by Neuroscience researchers for my day job. The book goes overboard with myeline hypothesis for learning without balancing it with other hypothesis out there. What about synapse formation, reusing old under used circuits as well as molecular mechanisms including Epigenetic mechanisms of memory formation?
Author may have discarded them for simplicity but that draws an incomplete and thus inaccurate picture of how our brains learn and remember new skills. Things like chunking and deep practice are well known. Not much new there. Overall average one time listen.

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Must read

Talent Code is simply brilliant
When I found out Tony Robbins was reading it - I purchased the audio immediately

It is now in my top 5 overall
And is no. 1 for brain science books.

Thanks Daniel Coyle

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Great book!

Gives a different perspective on how learning occurs and makes you understand the biological process.

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Intriguing. Making my kids listen to it.

Any additional comments?

To understand how the brain works a little more is extremely helpful, especially with younger kids still studying, trying new things and learning skills. This book and most of the details presented were enciteful enough that I want my kids to listen to at least the first couple hours of the book to hear how the brain functions when they attempt to get better at a task. Towards the end it gets a little long with examples and more stories of deep practice, so it could have been edited to be a shorter and the concept wouldn't have been lost to the reader/listener. I wish I could have read this book when I was younger.<br/><br/>I read some of the 1 & 2 star ratings, which I always do before a purchase to see if their critiques has merit. For this book, my opinion is that the few I read do not. The 1 and 2 star reviews may have thought this was a medical book, which it clearly isn't and their reviews come across as pompous. Judge for yourself, but I enjoyed the topic. Great book.

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I had no idea...

I wish I had known this stuff when I still played sports back in high school. Dear God. I could have been SO much better. glad I'm at least learning it at 26 while I can still utilize it to its fullest potential. if you want to get better at just about anything, read this book.

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There is myelin in the rabbit hole

A book worth reading that can bring insight into an understanding of talent beyond what is normally accepted or understood. Unfortunately the original researcher Mr Myelin passed on but paved they way for people like the author of this book to build upon what was found.