Regular price: $27.97

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Editorial Reviews

Why You Should Download This Audiobook: It's hard to believe how much interest one man can generate in plants, but Michael Pollan does it. And he's a bit of an iconoclast, revealing a side of Johnny Appleseed (think hard apple cider) you might not have known, and tiptoeing through generations of tulip hybridization to account for a dearth in rarity. Offbeat or unexpected nonfiction works like this are a pleasure to listen to, placing the most common of things in new light. We learned a lot from this audiobook.

Publisher's Summary

Every schoolchild learns about the mutually beneficial dance of honeybees and flowers: The bee collects nectar and pollen to make honey and, in the process, spreads the flowers' genes far and wide. In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship. He masterfully links four fundamental human desires, sweetness, beauty, intoxication, and control, with the plants that satisfy them: the apple, the tulip, marijuana, and the potato. In telling the stories of four familiar species, Pollan illustrates how the plants have evolved to satisfy humankind's most basic yearnings. And just as we've benefited from these plants, the plants have also benefited at least as much from their association with us. So who is really domesticating whom?
©2001 by Michael Pollan; (P)2006 by Audio Evolution, LLC

Critic Reviews

"[Pollan] has a wide-ranging intellect, an eager grasp of evolutionary biology and a subversive streak that helps him to root out some wonderfully counterintuitive points. His prose both shimmers and snaps, and he has a knack for finding perfect quotes in the oddest places....Best of all, Pollan really loves plants." (The New York Times Book Review)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    1,093
  • 4 Stars
    663
  • 3 Stars
    298
  • 2 Stars
    84
  • 1 Stars
    50

Performance

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    744
  • 4 Stars
    407
  • 3 Stars
    178
  • 2 Stars
    30
  • 1 Stars
    24

Story

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    745
  • 4 Stars
    409
  • 3 Stars
    164
  • 2 Stars
    36
  • 1 Stars
    28
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Heinen
  • Spokane, WA, United States
  • 09-08-11

Give it time

This book seems to start slow but when you give it some time and get in to the meat and potatoes of what Pollan has to offer its truly amazing! Well researched and well read... so glad I took a chance on this one! I will definitely be looking in to Pollan's other works!

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Much More Than Expected

A friend recommended this book and my first thought was, "it doesn't sound like what I like." I couldn't have been happier to have been wrong. And while I thought I would find the story of cannibus most interesting, I was wrong again. Amazingly, it was the lowly potato and apple that I liked most. Who would have thought that the plants would have such interesting stories? Well, now I can say that I know. Thank you Mr. Pollan and Mr. Brick.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Beth
  • Freeburg, IL, United States
  • 08-27-11

I wish there was a zero stars rating

Just awful. The author goes off point, repeats himself, and never proves his original hypothesis. Complete waste of time.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Laura
  • Manchester, NH, United States
  • 06-26-11

Interesting and entertaining...

I learned, I laughed, I didn't cry... a great listen for my commute (actually had me looking forward to my hours in the car each day). The narration took a little getting used to, but won me over in the end.

  • Overall

Generally lacking in content

the review title pretty much says it all. also pollan has a strong tendency to portray his opinions as though their accepted facts. this is seriously irritating as those opinions which he presents this way are almost always either out right wrong or have no hard data about them to form with certainty an opinion either way.

  • Overall

A good read

This is a good read if you like reading popularist science and/or anthropology books. Somewhat similar to Jared Diamond or Tim Flannery, with a focus on the post-Renaissance world and possibly a more philosophical bent.

  • Overall

Good, but not amazing

I found this book had a significant amount of really, really interesting information relating to the history/botany/biology of the topic plants. I found it very hard to get through the lengthy passages of introspection and other topics that have very little to do with apples, tulips, canabis, or potatos. I think his favorite word is Dionysus. Look for it in every other paragraph.

  • Overall
  • Joseph
  • Agawam, MA, USA
  • 05-25-10

I found it very interesting!

I enjoyed this book, I was afraid it would be a sort of enviro nut type of story, but the author does a decent job of keeping it logical aside from a few global warming references it was very educational. This is the type of book I wouldn't normal download but was glad I did, I will never look at apples and especially potatoes the same way.

  • Overall
  • wendy
  • Newark, NJ, United States
  • 04-30-10

An excellent listen!!

Michael Pollan's book is a joy to listen to, and I was very sad when it ended. I'm off to find some more of his books to listen to- greatly recommended.

  • Overall

Very Disappointing

One of the very few books I couldn't finish. There was very little hard science, which is what I wanted. Most of what I heard is now taught in middle school. And the section on apples was almost totally about the legend and reality of Johnny Appleseed. I too quit after the apple section. So different from The Omnivore's Dilemma, which I found fascinating. Same narrator for both, yet in this book he struck the wrong tone.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful