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Editorial Reviews

Mary Roach unzips the body bag and tells us far more than we thought we wanted to know about what happens to our bodies after we pass away. And yet somehow, she makes you want to know even more. It's like watching something repulsive but fascinating through cracks in the fingers you placed over your eyes so you wouldn't see. The author takes a deliberately humorous, academic tone as she describes these fascinating atrocities, and Shelly Frasier mirrors the author's tone perfectly. That very dry humor pervades the entire book; never cynical or condescending, never adolescent or tasteless, and it makes what could be a ghastly, repellent subject surprisingly upbeat and entertaining. Despite all that, we can't recommend that you listen to this audio book with a bunch of 11- or 12-year-old girls in the car with you, unless you enjoy hearing "Eeeew - gross!" squealed in a high-pitched voice over and over again. To some, that would be a fate worse than...well, death.

Publisher's Summary

An oddly compelling, often hilarious exploration of the strange lives of our bodies postmortem.

For two thousand years, cadavers (some willingly, some unwittingly) have been involved in science's boldest strides and weirdest undertakings. They've tested France's first guillotines, ridden the NASA Space Shuttle, been crucified in a Parisian laboratory to test the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin, and helped solve the mystery of TWA Flight 800. For every new surgical procedure, from heart transplants to gender reassignment surgery, cadavers have been there alongside surgeons, making history in their quiet way.

In this fascinating, ennobling account, Mary Roach visits the good deeds of cadavers over the centuries from the anatomy labs and human-sourced pharmacies of medieval and nineteenth-century Europe to a human decay research facility in Tennessee, to a plastic surgery practice lab, to a Scandinavian funeral directors' conference on human composting. In her droll, inimitable voice, Roach tells the engrossing story of our bodies when we are no longer with them.

©2003 Mary Roach (P)2003 Tantor Media, Inc.

Critic Reviews

  • Alex Award Winner, 2004

"Uproariously funny....informative and respectful...irreverent and witty....impossible to put down." (Publishers Weekly)
"Not grisly but inspiring, this work considers the many valuable scientific uses of the body after death." (Library Journal)
"One of the funniest and most unusual books of the year." (Entertainment Weekly)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
  • Joel
  • Toronto, ON, Canada
  • 05-28-05

Wonderful and En'gross'ing

I wouldn't have thought it possible to treat this sometimes unpleasant topic with equal parts humour and respect. Mary Roach succeeds admirably in both aspects. I listened to this book almost straight through, with my responses ranging from cringing to laughing out loud.
Shelly Frasier is an excellent casting choice for this book as her voice has a sultry tone to it. It is not clinical at all.

Highly recommended if you're not squeamish.

23 of 23 people found this review helpful

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  • Matthew
  • Wauwatosa, WI, USA
  • 03-15-04

Darn funny if you're open to the idea.

If you believe the subject of cadavers should be treated somberly under all circumstances, you'll want to take a pass on this one. If, on the other hand, you have an irreverent sense of humor and believe that there some sort of humor in almost every slice of life (and death), then you're going to love this book. Informative, well-written, witty, and done in a mostly tasteful way (it is about cadavers after all), Stiff is a fresh book that explores a topic and a world that most of us never glimpse.

47 of 48 people found this review helpful

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  • Mark
  • Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States
  • 11-17-11

Who Knew?

Not for the faint of heart, this book examines in detail possible uses and methods of handling the human body a life after death I had never considered. The author deftly hanbles the subject with surprising humor. The narrator was excellent.

I enjoyed this book.

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

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  • Joshua
  • Philadelphia, PA, USA
  • 08-11-05

A superb read

I highly recommend this book. I couldn't stop listening. It is a serious book about a serious subject, but it does lighten the darker, if at times, horrific elements of being the dearly departed. Shelly Frasier does a good job of transmitting the author's sense of humor and life--and does not telegraph a "cynical" point of view; rather she captures the dark, sometimes humorous, sometimes bizarre and often ironic issues related to death which, after all, is everyone's fate.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

You cut heads off! You cut heads off!!

Funniest non-fiction I've ever read! This is a fantastic read. To those who criticized the "unnecessary" gruesomeness... it's about dead people!! Come on!! The author does a fine job respectfully making light of something people are way to squeamish about. I highly recommend this book. It was a fun read, and educational at the same time - just the sort for which I was looking.

18 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

facinating

When I was a student, in 1984, I took a summer class in which I prepared cadavers for the next semester's anatomy and physiology class. It was one of the best summer's of my life. Those memories will carry me to my grave, so to speak. One of the cadavers that I worked on was a physician (in his former life), one was a woman, and one was a man of no particular distinction. I am now a nurse of some 24 years. My experiences then still reverberate to this day. This book addresses all of the feelings and emotions that I experienced at that time. It is an amazing, humorous, light-hearted, yet serious work, that captured the essence of what it means to be a cadaver. No small feat. Bravo, Mary Roach. Well done.

27 of 29 people found this review helpful

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  • Shannon
  • Chicago, IL, United States
  • 04-23-08

Not for everyone, but I enjoyed it

Although this book verges on the macabre at some points, with extremely graphic descriptions of, say, bodies rotting in an empty lot, I found it fascinating. I liked the many uses for cadavers, the descriptions of the science of various specialities, and the history of anatomical and cadaver studies. The author has a quirky sense of humor, and many of her quips are things I would have thought myself. I also liked the narrator's voice, which was pleasant and not too serious. Unfortunately, neither the narrator nor the producer ensured that the narrator pronounced all the words correctly. Almost every chapter had at least one mispronunciation that jarred me. Among them "Oriana Fal-ah-see" (Oriana Fallaci - which I admit is not a common name), "Rooters" (Reuters), and "apokethary" (apothecary - which she pronounces correctly a few lines later.) This book has by far the largest number of mispronunciations of the seventy or so I've listened to. It is nonetheless an interesting, informative and strangely enjoyable listen.

17 of 18 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Julie
  • Niles, IL, USA
  • 04-20-04

This is a light, wonderful book.

The author is incredibly witty and clever. She writes like an old friend sharing a funny store with you in a coffee shop. I've bought it for 2 friends already, and the feedback from them has been just as positive as my experience with it.

15 of 16 people found this review helpful

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  • Clint
  • Buffalo Grove, IL, USA
  • 04-20-04

Great book!

This was actually a very interesting and well researched book & and was generally a lot of fun to listen to. The reader was fantastic, too. Her "smoky" voice was compelling, without being overly dramatic. Be prepared, though, for the stories of brutality that some (I hope not many) "scientists" (and I use the word loosely, at least with some of them as described here)brutalized (and still brutalize, I know) defenseless animals, in the name of "science". The people that I am describing truly, in my opinion, have cold hearts and no empathy for other living things. The book, as a whole, was top notch and very enlightening. The "experiments" are just part of the story, I guess.
Overall, I highly endorse this audiobook.

21 of 23 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

corpses turned fantastic read

Gosh! Who knew corpses could be so fun and fascinating?! Mary Roach has gone to the end and back on topics you could not even imagine that deal with the dead. In one sentence, she writes on how the dead have improved the lives of the living. Seriously, we learn how greatful we should be that Aunt Cloe donated herself to the good of human kind when she passed on. If you're squeemish about death, Roach is completely disarming with her lively and comedic style. Nothing vulgar or horrifying here, just the simple truth with hilarious side commentary.

Loved this book! I've even read it at least three times now.

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

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  • Preety
  • 12-04-13

Really enjoyed

What did you like most about Stiff?

I liked the way the author questioned the reality of the human corpse and how this vessel can serve a new purpose after the should has left it.

Who was your favorite character and why?

No favorite character but I did like the report on the plastic surgeons and how they perceived these cadavers.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

No scene but I found it interesting the disposal of bodies and how aviation has used corpses to improve issues of safety

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I think it would be the plastic surgeons and the humanity that they share with the dead person that they are practising upon.

Any additional comments?

I really enjoyed the book and the narration, well worth a purchase

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Ian
  • 03-13-16

This is so cool!

I love learning new things and finding out how things work. This is no exception!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Adrian
  • 12-01-15

Inclusive, welcoming writing from Mary Roach

I bought this based on previously enjoying Packing for Mars (one of my favourite audio books). Unlike Packing for Mars, this book is more of a mixture of history and culture with a light dip in to science and it does not suffer for it.
The narrator reads beautifully and the words are engaging.
A highly recommended audio book for anyone who is not too squeemish.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • treilly
  • 08-03-15

Really good read

A great book, would highly recommended to anyone with a morbid curiosity like myself. It was informative without being too disgusting or disrespectful, if you weren't instantly put-off by the description you'll probably be fine. In terms of performance it was really well read and easy to follow.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Lidia
  • 03-23-17

Interesting and weird

Well, I have never got to know how may things the humans have done with cadavers and how useful actually they can be. It's of course a book full of weird things but if you keep an open mind you can go beyond that weirdness and actually enjoy it.

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  • "paulajane73"
  • 03-16-17

Surprisingly enthralling

I expected this to be fascinating, and wasn't disappointed, but i wasn't expecting it to be so funny. The descriptions of some pretty horrible processes told with self deprecating humour was wonderfully entertaining. I loved it.

  • Overall
  • Mandy Dockery
  • 03-12-17

Extremely Interesting!

I was dubious about buying this book worrying it would be too Gory or Sensational. Its neither its a Teacher of sorts and I have learned from it- One of the best books I've listened too this year. Great narration too!

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  • S. Kadhim
  • 10-21-16

Brilliant

Would you listen to Stiff again? Why?

Yes, I would. I've always been interested in dead bodies - have always liked the idea of going to work as a mortician or in a funeral home - so I was very engaged throughout the book. Plus, there was so much information, I'm sure I missed some of it the first time round!

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, definitely. The only reason I wouldn't is because of the length.

Any additional comments?

I do not recommend listening to the airplane crash testing chapter while flying - like I did. I'm not usually a nervous flyer, but I certainly was on that flight...<br/><br/>I'd say that you should listen even if you're not sure you're interested in this. It covers a lot of topics, the narrator is excellent and entertaining, and Mary Roach's writing is funny and bright.

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  • Michael
  • 06-09-16

A down to earth, thought provoking discussion

I came into this book not knowing what to expect. I never knew who Mary Roach was until I heard her speak about her latest book Grunt on the podcast Sawbones. When I looked up her past writings, I found an array of fascinating subjects that I'd never thought to read about. Stiff is written in an informal yet respectful tone, funny in some places yet businesslike in others, much like the people who have to deal with corpses on a daily basis. A fascinating piece. I can't wait to read Roach's next book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful