Regular price: $3.95

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

Simulated reality is the hypothesis that reality could be simulated - for example by quantum computer simulation - to a degree indistinguishable from "true" reality. It could contain conscious minds which may or may not be fully aware that they are living inside a simulation. This is quite different from the current, technologically achievable concept of virtual reality. Virtual reality is easily distinguished from the experience of actuality; participants are never in doubt about the nature of what they experience. Simulated reality, by contrast, would be hard or impossible to separate from "true" reality. There has been much debate over this topic, ranging from philosophical discourse to practical applications in computing. 

The version of the simulation hypothesis was first theorized as a part of a philosophical argument on the part of René Descartes. Later, the philosopher Nick Bostrom developed an expanded argument examining the probability of our reality being a simulation. 

His argument states that at least one of the following statements is very likely to be true: 

  1. Human civilization is unlikely to reach a level of technological maturity capable of producing simulated realities or such simulations are physically impossible to construct.
  2. A comparable civilization reaching aforementioned technological status will likely not produce a significant number of simulated realities (one that might push the probable existence of digital entities beyond the probable number of "real" entities in a Universe) for any of a number of reasons, such as diversion of computational processing power for other tasks, ethical considerations of holding entities captive in simulated realities, etc.
  3. Any entities with our general set of experiences are almost certainly living in a simulation.
  4. We are living in a reality in which posthumans haven't developed yet and we are actually living in reality.
©2018 Austin Waters (P)2018 Austin Waters

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1

Performance

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Are you real ?

This is a good overview of Simulation Theory.It is a concise
explanation of the possibility of our existence being based on some
type of Matrix scenario.

The use of advanced Quantum Computers or other type of Computer or
Computer related Technology with enormous storage and memory capacity beyond even the Theory of our current state of Technology.The narrator did a good job in presenting the Theory.


This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Descarte’s Demon gets a Digital Update

What should have been presented as an interesting philosophical exercise in epistemology and metaphysics, verged on conspiracy theory.

Doubting the evidence of your senses is helpful for an experiment, but the author offers no way out of the matrix. He didn’t even offer Descarte’s path out of the cloud of unknowing.

This is an interesting idea with some fresh insight into new angles that technology could yield on an age old problem of escaping Plato’s cave, but he brought in crop circles as proof that we are living in a computer simulation. I wasn’t convinced.

The narrator did a great job and this gave some fun brain candy to chew on, just don’t let it rot your neurons.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • TJ Fitz
  • CA United States
  • 06-14-18

Too "Culty" For Me

I was not a fan of this book. I thought it would be an informational piece on what simulation theory is. But, as I found out after listening, you're better off just reading the Wikipedia page. Literally, the intro to the Wikipedia page IS the description for this book... The arguments in this book were, for the most part, flawed at best. They can be summarized as follows: There are patterns in nature, and elements in life that are sort of like simulations that we run; therefore, our lives must be a simulation.

To me, that's a chicken or the egg argument. The author compared two things, and just chose which came first. Many of the other "points" and "evidence" were just ramblings and random thoughts. At one point, the author snuck in a statement that these were only "suggested evidence", then kept on going.

It got a bit cult-like when the author stated that since there are no good new creations now, that we must be near the end of time, and that our existence will be soon coming to an abrupt end. "But do not worry, it is going to be better". That, followed by "life means continuity, and death is not the end, just an exit from this world...". At this point I realized I was not a fan of the reader either. Up until that point I was not bothered (I listened to the sample, and didn't mind it then).

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

somewhat useful

good introduction, but very short and not all evidence was equally compelling or explained. still it has value for an obscure topic.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • TU
  • 05-30-18

... sigh

I was given this free review copy audio book at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

After finishing this short book, I'm kind of left scratching my head. I am genuinely confused on if this book is serious or satyre. The claims and even the evidence of their arguments comes across almost satyrical, which led to my uncertainty. The narration is great by Ron Welch, but the book just kind of throws a list of ideas and states one of them is very likely true and here is why. I get the author is trying to get people to question what is reality, but most of their premises are silly. This author is either going for satyre or they are trying way too hard to wax philosophically.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Kingsley
  • Henely Brook, Australia
  • 05-11-18

Doesn't really explain just bombards with ideas

'Simulation Theory Explained' doesn't really explain anything. It is more just a barrage of a list of reasons why it could be true, without fully explaining the items of the list. It drops a whole lot of premises for it's argument without giving any good explanation for where those premises come from. It also felt like the logical from some of the premises to the if-so-then of the next premise wasn't actually there. It's a leap that the author assume without backing it up well. Maybe the arguments have good basis, maybe they don't. But this book doesn't have the time in it to build that depth. The list is basically an introduction of what will be discussed in later chapters of the book, but those chapters never come.

The latter half of the book tries give a little more detail around the history with René Descartes and Nick Bostrom (it also touches on the work by Ludwig Boltzmann and the Boltzmann Brain, but doesnt actually mention his name). It would have been better to have some of this information up front as it does better to explain where the idea came from and what it actually is.

Overall the book is too presumptuous and too quick to gloss over ideas.

Narration by Ron Welch is good. Clear and well paced, easy to understand. No issues with it.

I was voluntarily provided this free review copy audiobook by the author, narrator, or publisher.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

A Nice Summary of Simulation Theory

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this unbiased, voluntary review.

I would like to note this is my first experience with simulation theory, so I can not say whether it covered all the necessary points.

I throughly enjoyed this book. It was an interesting perspective of life that I had never thought of before. The possible evidence seemed loose at best including saying crop circles could not be created by people but had to be from a simulation. I would say much of this book is speculation, but it is quite interesting if you don’t believe every word.

Ron Welch was great! He had a strong, confident voice. He never missed a beat and I was entranced by is delivery.

As a short little book, I would recommend listening to this different perspective on the world you know.