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Editorial Reviews

Distinguished Scottish psychologist Ian J. Dreary packs a plethora of information in this succinct yet tremendously insightful 125-page primer that explores the limits of human mental capacity, addresses the biological, environmental, and genetic factors that influence a person’s intelligence, and provides a glimpse into the evolving field of psychometrics.

Ray Chase’s pleasant and sprightly tone will engage the listener from the first line of this enriching listen aimed at the layperson interested in learning more about his fascinating area of study.

Publisher's Summary

For people with little or no knowledge of the science of human intelligence, this volume takes listeners to a stage where they are able to make judgments for themselves about the key questions of human mental ability. Each chapter addresses a central scientific issue but does so in a way that is lively and completely accessible. Issues discussed include whether there are several different types of intelligence, whether intelligence differences are caused by genes or the environment, the biological basis of intelligence levels, and whether intelligence declines as we grow older.

©2001 Ian J. Deary (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

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dodged and aged

he dodged some of the more thorny questions of intelligence discourse (racial and gender disparities, and the very definitions of intelligence). in any case, it is now 14 years old and shows its age -- we've learned a lot since then, and the preliminary reports given here have had follow ups, qualifications, and contradictions.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Not a bad review of IQ

A sound and basic review of over 100 years of psychological study into the numerical measurement of IQ.

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  • Thomas
  • Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • 07-26-16

Good book within limits

More of an introduction to intelligence testing than a philosophical discussion of the meaning of intelligence.