Regular price: $24.47

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free.
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price.
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love.
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel.
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month.
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

A compilation of podcasts broadcast on WGN radio in Chicago, called I'm Spiritual, Dammit! Volume Two includes episodes with the following guests:

Dr. Mary Neal

Dr. Scott Kolbaba

Dr. Trupti Gokani

Dr. Jeffrey Long

P. M. H. Atwater

Dr. Adam Miller

Dr. Jeffrey Rediger

Dr. Penny Sartori

Dr. Ian Smith

Dr. Jordan Lesiure

©2018 Jenniffer Weigel (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Paul
  • Kitchener, ON, Canada
  • 08-12-18

Misleading Book Title

The opening interview featuring Dr. Scott Kolbaba will be of greatest interest to the follower of ND experiences.

Weigel's other guests, for the most part, veer off into woo-woo land with their forays into alternative medicine or new-age crystals territory. P.M.H. Atwater, who has always struck me as a big phoney, comes across as little more than a trumpet section for her own cascade of books on the topic.

Interestingly, those guests who mention the name of Dr. Raymond Moody, a credible pioneer in NDE documentation, all claim never to have heard of the man or his books prior to commencing their own NDE-related gigs. We're left with the unspoken suggestion that they were led into this field through mystical events that befell them in their own lives. Some of these guests offer interesting or helpful comments, but generally, the interviews do not pursue the stated topic.

There are subsequent references to Near Death Experiences, but apart from Kolbaba's discussion, these are mostly peripheral references to the subject. This book is a major disappointment.