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Publisher's Summary

The Internet and smartphone are just the latest in a 250-year-long cycle of disruption that has continuously changed the way we live, the way we work, and the way we interact. The coming Augmented Age, however, promises a level of disruption, behavioral shifts, and changes that are unparalleled. While consumers today are camping outside of an Apple store waiting to be one of the first to score a new Apple Watch or iPhone, the next generation of wearables will be able to predict if we're likely to have a heart attack and recommend a course of action. We watch news of Google's self-driving cars, but don't likely realize this means progressive cities will have to ban human drivers in the next decade because us humans are too risky. Following on from the Industrial or Machine Age, the Space Age and the Digital Age, the Augmented Age will be based on four key disruptive themes - Artificial Intelligence, Experience Design, Smart Infrastructure, and HealthTech. Historically, the previous "ages" brought significant disruption and changes, but on a net basis, jobs were created, wealth was enhanced, and the health and security of society improved. What will the Augmented Age bring? Will robots take our jobs and AI's subsume us as inferior intelligences? Or will this usher in a new age of abundance?

Augmented is a book on future history, but, more than that, it is a story about how you will live your life in a world that will change more in the next 20 years than it has in the last 250 years. Are you ready to adapt? Because if history proves anything, you don't have much of a choice.

©2016 Brett King (P)2017 Tantor

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All Headlines

It read as if it were a bunch of headlines, but didn't feel like it was of much substance. I wanted to like it, but I can say, save your money. summary - everything in the future will be subscription based and individually customized and connected.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

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All the authors need is a couple of pom poms

I was quite excited to listen to this book, but was quickly disappointed.

It's basically a long list of technical innovations of the past with the authors cheerleading whatever *might* happen ... There is very little actual reflection on what the trends might mean, other than that the millennials and subsequent generations will deal with any disruptions incredibly well because they are uniquely (surprise-surprise) adept and adaptable, having been raised in a digital world.

The narrator was good.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Our Augmented self

The author makes bold predictions about how technology will change us in ways we can't even imagine right now.

This book puts into context the type of change that modern technology of information abundance can have on our psyche and how this will bring our an explosion in innovation.

Realistic in its projections, and fascinating with its predictions, an all round enjoyable book Looking at near future possibilities and their ramifications to society and civilisation.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Lots of examples

Not sure how I really feel about this book. It have A LOT of examples on how technology will intertwine with daily life in the future. I appreciate that. But it was almost as if the whole book was put together from thousands of news articles. The audible version was also read in a way that was rather uninspiring.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

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Read by an AI.

I'm starting to like forwarding thinking books like this, Flash Foresight, and Humans Need Not Apply. So while the content was ok, it really did drone on from the uninterested narration.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful

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Excellent account of technology impact

Excellent book with good examples of how technology will impact life and businesses. The author nicely explained tough and difficult terms and new information, in a very easy to understand way.

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Overly optimistic

The authors assume too much regarding human nature and our receptiveness to future augmentation technology. They paint a rosy picture that just doesn't feel right. They assume that those with power will somehow magically be forced to give up that power and allow nations to crumble and become irrelevant. They gloss over the dangers of artificial intelligence like it was simply a matter of picking a color for our robot overlords. In general, I didn't find too much new in this book and I disagreed with many of its conclusions. Performance was adequate but a bit to monotonous.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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A must read/listen for anyone who loves tech

This is a must listen for everyone in tech. It is very rear for me to give 5 stars, but this book earned everyone of them.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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What a disappointment!

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

No I would not. This book was to make believe and fairy tale - ish. The book tries to quote "Moore's" law as fact and it's nothing more than an opinion that has been proven incorrect for the last several years in a row.

What could the authors have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

I'm good with speculating what we can augment in our day to day lives with technology but I don't like scare tactic's nor false data. I also don't like how the book states what the Internet can and can't do when today the Internet is turning into a dump. Darpa should have never released so much control of the Internet. There is sooooooo much front loading of websites it pathetic. And for ISP's to falsely say we need more and more bandwidth is just irresponsible.

What aspect of Steven Jay Cohen’s performance would you have changed?

His whole conspiracy theory voice drove me nut's! Especially when he's pushing unknown facts. I wish they would have had someone narrate the book who spoke in a normal voice. His whisper just made the book sound like a make believe journey or something.

Do you think Augmented needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

Yes absolutely. Website frontloading need's to be addressed. So many people have no idea what I'm talking about. They naively think when they type in www.whatever.com that they're going straight to that website. Sheez what a joke, today on average over 200 things get loaded down through your web-browser before you ever get to the website.

We also need to prosecute companies that get hacked. Experian is in the news currently. I'm sorry but their executive team needs to go, this is their 2nd or 3rd hack in so many years. You cannot tell me that their IT staff hasn't been warning them and they took the risk. Well they need to be held accountable.

Any additional comments?

Yes, please push for a browser that can dump front loading, data tracking, etc. Let it be easily user configurable. Explain the "dark web" to folks, explain TOR and the like.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • haluk
  • 09-12-17

It has nothing to offer

First of all, dramatic narration in non-fictional books really puts me off. That's why I kept listening to this book, thinking I shouldn't judge it by it's narration.

The book starts with telling how silly it is to reject new technology and ends with how unnecessary and futile it is to hold onto privacy. If you get rid of privacy, the store you walk into will know everything about you and you'll be spammed by advertisements tailored just for you. The author is thrilled by this idea for some reason. The final chapter is about smart marketing after all. Perfect way to finish this book.

In between is what I've already read on BBC technology page. No substantial debate or analysis. The book felt like a long sales pitch of an ideology. I think today's AI can easily replace the author.