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Editorial Reviews

Far from being a futuristic science, artificial intelligence is happening right now, and in this succinct and cutting-edge listen, University of Sussex Professor of Philosophy Blay Whitby guides us through this emerging field. Performed with typical enthusiasm and energy by accomplished audiobook narrator Richard Aspel, this audiobook introduces listeners to everything from nanotechnology and artificial neural nets to autodidactic computers. Including a critique of common myths about AI (like the idea that humans will become enslaved by machines, as in the film The Terminator), this riveting performance is a worthy introduction to the many successes of AI, as well as the field's promising future.

Publisher's Summary

Tomorrow begins right here as we embark on an enthralling and jargon-free journey into the world of computers and the inner recesses of the human mind. Readers encounter everything from the nanotechnology used to make insect-like robots, to the computers that perform surgery and, reminiscent of films like Terminator, computers that can learn by teaching themselves. Assuming no technical expertise whatsoever, author Blay Whitby steers a careful course through this futuristic world, revealing the pervasive impact of AI on our daily lives, in addition to discovering the biggest controversies to dog this fascinating field.

©2003 Blay Whitby © 2003 first ed.; 2003 Blay Whitby (P)2012 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

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A great discussion on human thought and computing

A good summary of artificial intelligence topics. This book contains information detailing the inception of the field, and how each branch has developed, forked, and crossed-disciplines. Ideas such as problem solving machines, systems that obtain and store knowledge, simulated logic and decision making, robotic navigation and world domination, process evolution, and visual object identification are covered. The source of the ideas are also explained, as most are functions found in nature and life. The boundaries of artificial intelligence at consciousness are also described. Yet even more ideas from art and philosophy are considered with the science of simulating intellect with machines. In summary, I found this book a great description of all the ways humans have sought to utilize humanities best features when inventing and creating technology.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Interesting intro level book.

Good coverage of the topic at a very high level viewpoint. However, it is getting a bit dated, it's about a decade behind the today's AI. Still worth listening to though.

A brief pause when transitioning sections and chapters would have greatly improved the performance.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Stupid book really!!

What would have made Artificial Intelligence: Bolinda Beginner Guides better?

Some real content.

Would you ever listen to anything by Blay Whitby again?

I am not going to judge Blay Whitby from one single instance. But I will think more before buying from them in future.

Any additional comments?

I only have problem with the content of the book really, nothing else. After really listening to this book, when I ask myself, what I learned?... I couldn't really answer it meaningfully!

2 of 3 people found this review helpful