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Publisher's Summary

First published in 1949 and praised in the New York Times Book Review as "full of beauty and vigor and bite", A Sand County Almanac combines some of the finest nature writing since Thoreau with an outspoken and highly ethical regard for America's relationship to the land. As the forerunner to such important books as Annie Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, Edward Abbey's Desert Solitaire, and Robert Finch's The Primal Place, this classic work remains as relevant today as it was nearly 70 years ago.

©1966 Oxford University Press, Inc. (P)2017 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5.0
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Performance

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
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    26
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    7
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Story

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  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

I have issues with the reading...

^^^ I have issues with the reading. It is very choppy or “stop and go”. He pauses in awkward places making it difficult (for me) to follow. But the story is solid and for sure, a must read. However, I’d buy the book -the reading takes getting used to. This performance could’ve been better

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Read this book.

Every American should study this book. This philosophy is now more commonplace but not understood by enough Americans. I suggest this book is taught in High School.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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amazing book, odd narrator

the book it's self is an amazing landmark for conservation. the narrator was just a bit one toned through the whole reading, it was hard to follow when transitioning from one work to the next.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Awesome content, worst narration

Struggled to get through this wonderful book because of the monotone, stilted narration. What a shame.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Great Listen!

An entertaining, insightful, and thoroughly thought out work from an inspiring conservationist and outdoorsman. Nearly 3/4 of a century old and still quite relevant to challenges the landscapes of ecosystems are faced with now.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Animal's perspective, Ecology, White privilege.

I thought the book was quite interesting it took the perspective that is usually not taken the most books. the ecology part of it was quite interesting it really does put stuff in the respective and as a range ecologist I would have to say that this book follows many ecology ideologies, like multi-use, ways to conserve but still be able to make some profit off the land. you can't just manage a ecosystem for one particular type you have to.
the one chapter about the passenger pigeon was pretty sad but also quite interesting in that it gave a lot of insight to how to better manage endangered species or create habitat for birds that otherwise people take for granted.
However, this book in last 3rd section has a focus on white perspectives of American 1940s towards the end of the book. Don't get me wrong it's still in focuses on the main ideas of ecology but it glossing over the Native American perspective in favor of the pioneer and the white American. It's kind of a typical factor of books written and this period And earlier, however when referencing Latin America Africa Asia he still considers them less civilized than Europe in America.
besides that little criticism about you know it being an old book and it's style of college professors old white people writing. It is still a great book about early conservation ecology ideology and main ideas of ecology. The narrators voice was fine.

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Some good points, but tedious.

*Sigh* Where do I start? Like many so called "classics", this book fails to live up to the hype. It feels like a collection of random tangents without a central arch. There were several anecdotes that I found very valuable, but most of the points the author makes are nearly drowned out by his overindulgence of elevated prose. This, combined with his penchant for differentiating himself from the layman, gives the work an air of arrogance. This is furthered by the performer's tone. His voice is sharp and harsh to the ear.
This book seems to do much better diced up into excerpt and sprinkled into other works on similar subjects. I do not regret listening to it, but it would be a stretch to say I enjoyed it.

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A masterpiece.

This book was gorgeous, devastating, and incredibly educational. The narrator did a great job. If you are easily lost in your thoughts, though, this book makes it a little difficult to zone back in; you will have to rewind to understand the topic.

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great read for families

great book and a good look of the foreshadowing of what has become. a must read for kids

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Great book finally available unabridged

Would you consider the audio edition of A Sand County Almanac to be better than the print version?

No, the printed word still seems better but this is a sorely needed unabridged version of this environmental classic.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Only characters are the descriptions of land and

Would you listen to another book narrated by Mike Chamberlain?

Perhaps a business or other non-fiction choice. I thought he narrated this book in the style of a dispassionate newscaster. His forced hard rhythmic cadence in the majority of the book detracted from the depth and feeling of the writing. This book is very lyrical and poetic at times and I would have preferred someone who had more of an emotional connection to the text. I see that he was rated highly on other of his narrations but I think there could have been better choices for this particular work. By the last 1-2 hours of the book, he improves.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I was impressed again by some of the eloquent descriptions of nature and landscapes. The story of his regret at killing a wolf, or "goose music", or describing the history of a tree he saws down are among the great works of nature writing.

Any additional comments?

I eagerly anticipated the release of this unabridged version of this classic work of nature writing. It was very much needed. Although I was disappointed by the narration. The book is still great enough that it deserves to be listened to. However, I hope someday an even better version is released. I still greatly appreciate that this was released.