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Publisher's Summary

Conrad Nomikos has a long, rich personal history that he'd rather not talk about. And, as arts commissioner, he's been given a job he'd rather not do. Escorting an alien grandee on a guided tour of the shattered remains of Earth is not something he relishes - especially since it is apparent that this places him at the center of high-level intrigue that has some bearing on the future of Earth itself. But Conrad is a very special guy....

Written by the late Roger Zelazny, This Immortal was originally published under the title ...and Call Me Conrad. It shared the 1966 Hugo Award for Best Novel with Frank Herbert's Dune.

©1966 Roger Zelazny; (P)2008 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

  • Hugo Award, Best Novel, 1966

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
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Performance

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
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Story

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
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  • Overall

Master of Sci-Fi

Picture this..
Earth is now a shadow of itself after going through a nuclear holocaust. The Vegan's have taken over - no no, not that type, picture Vogons (Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy). Conrad (the narrator) has been tasked with being the tour guide.. he's not keen on the idea.. but during this the Vegan's life is threatened and we find that it has become imperative that the Vegan stays alive... but why... the book gently takes you and carries you through to the end..


Definitely one of those books that I would put up there with:
Karel Capek - R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots)
Aldous Huxley - Brave New World

BTW: those that have read my review will know I am quite particular about narration - has to be engaging and clear.. definitely a thumbs up here. Victor Bevine is definitely someone to follow.





23 of 26 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Jane
  • Kambah ACT Australia
  • 12-25-09

Zelazney's humour and lyricism

I love Zelazney and this is one of my favourites. The reader is a bit too intense. He doesn't use enough inflection for my taste. He can do Zelazney's wonderful lyricism, but he doesn't emphasis the throw away humour, the great sense of timing and the bathos that undercut the lyricism. Conrad is complex, sincere,cynical and full of energy. He should sound more like Zorba the Greek or Steamboy, not like an English teacher.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

poetry

This is filled with lots of imagery and references to mythology. It reads like poetry.

If you are well educated and like poetry you will love this. There are lots of big words. If you are a fan of Gaimen's American Gods, I believe you will like this.

I am not a fan of poetry, Gaimen or academia, so I did not enjoy the book. Having also read Dream Master and not liking it, I am not a RZ fan.

To each his own, Gaimen and RZ have a huge following and probably are not fans of Orson Scott Card and Robin Hobb.

You will either love it or hate.

16 of 20 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Interesting early Zelazny work, better than some

I felt the performance was the best part, and I enjoy the main character. The beginning is a bit droll and hard to sit through, but once you're through with the exposition the story really does pickup quite a bit. Otherwise, if you're at all familiar with Zelazny, it's an interesting early work that shows the first stages of his unique style and tone. It does still feel like a novice work, however, in that his allusions are still more than a little forced, even intentionally self-conscious, but certainly without the seamless integration that is truly a hallmark of his later works. Listen to it, though, and enjoy it nonetheless.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Vincent
  • Fayetteville, GA, USA
  • 09-05-08

Not my favorite Zelazny but still good

When reading Zelazny, you have to get the context in which it was wriiten, otherwise it just seems dated. Zelazny, Harlan Ellison and others were part of the "New Wave" of SF writers that ushered in a new age of SF to counter the post world war II "golden age" SF of the 1950s. Gone were the superhuman warrior heroes of Robert Heinlein and the rest. Now we had anti-heroes with human flaws and a more introspective/cynical world views. Having said that, Zelazny was still able to strike a balance between cynicism of the new and the romanticism of the old. This book, while not my favorite of his, still shows off Zelazny's power to blend Science, History and Ancient Myth. I also like the narrator they chose for this one. Good listen!

7 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Narration among the worst

Normally I really enjoy R.Z.'s books, but the narration of the beginning was so monotone with way too many long pauses. I could not even follow what the narrator was saying and did not even get past the first 10 minutes. Just to give you an idea how bad it was..."Gnash, Gnash the teeth. Clippity clop, the hooves" became "Gnash <pause> gnash <long pause> the teeth <longer long pause> clippity <pause> clop <long pause> the hooves." The pauses were so long it was actually hard to link the words together. Save your money and skip this version.

8 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Antonia
  • Toronto, ON, Canada
  • 07-23-08

More Zelazny please

He was one of the finest writers in SF, and its nice to seem some audiobooks being made. I am not a purist and I would even purchase the Amber audiobooks. I have read Heinlein, Asimov, Herbert and a host of others and he is still one of the best.
Please more audiobooks from him. Thanks, James

8 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A disappointment

This book was boring and confusing, replete with many tongue twisting Greek names and references to ancient Greek myths. It was by an author that I liked and had won a Hugo award so it was a great disappointment.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Performance
  • Story

The story just didn't stick with me,didn't like it

Pretty much struggled to finish and even was boring 80% of times. There were small nice bits though, but they don't deserve to stand up for the story.
Even for free, wouldn't get it and would not recommend others. But, if you like Greeks and their mythology and apocalypse world, may be, with a small chance you'll like it. But I think that even the apocalypse world and the story, scenery was developed poorly. And the whole thing is very wield!

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

one of my favorite Zelazny books...

...and I _love_ Zelazny. I've read this many times over the years and it was great fun to hear it in a different form. If you enjoy more contemporary authors like Neil Gaiman you'll definitely dig this.

5 of 8 people found this review helpful

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  • Overall
  • June
  • 09-23-08

Is Zelazny being forgotten?

Zelazny has always been a strange mixture of Hemmingway and Fantasy. He evokes a picture of a ravished world where his (anii-)hero has become an anachronism. If you like this book then be sure to read his Nine Princes in Amber series.
A well written story with a suitable narrator.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Sophia
  • 01-27-12

Oldie but goodie

I loved this. Short by my preferences, but interesting, textured and with a very satisfying ending.