Regular price: $24.05

Free with 30-day trial
Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – good for any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • After your trial, Audible is just $14.95/month
OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

The Shadow of the Torturer is the first volume in the four-volume epic, the tale of a young Severian, an apprentice to the Guild of Torturers on the world called Urth, exiled for committing the ultimate sin of his profession - showing mercy towards his victim.
Listen to more in the Book of the New Sun series.
©1980 Gene Wolfe; (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"The best science fiction novel of the last century." (Neil Gaiman)
  • World Fantasy Award, Best Novel, 1981
  • Favorite Audiobooks of 2010 (Fantasy Literature)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.7 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    540
  • 4 Stars
    375
  • 3 Stars
    289
  • 2 Stars
    150
  • 1 Stars
    136

Performance

  • 4.0 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    539
  • 4 Stars
    318
  • 3 Stars
    162
  • 2 Stars
    62
  • 1 Stars
    68

Story

  • 3.8 out of 5.0
  • 5 Stars
    448
  • 4 Stars
    284
  • 3 Stars
    211
  • 2 Stars
    114
  • 1 Stars
    96
Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Ryan
  • Somerville, MA, United States
  • 03-20-10

great writing, won't appeal to everyone

There was a time when the fantasy genre didn't just exist to entertain, but sometimes aspired to a higher level of artfulness. The Shadow of the Torturer is such a book. Set in a far distant future, when Earth's sun is fading and human society has lost much of its technological aptitude, Wolfe's novel has a haunting, elegiac quality. It's written in a voice reminiscent of 19th century writers like Poe or Dickens, which adds to the melancholy beauty. Fortunately for the squeamish, though torture is part of the story, it's not described in much detail.

In terms of plot, The Shadow of the Torturer isn't a complex novel. The protagonist grows up under the protection of a strange, cloistered society, learns a few things about the outside world, betrays his guardians, and is thrown out to seek his own fortune -- familiar fantasy stuff. But what sets the book apart from standard swords-and-sorcery fare is the richness of its language and the great imagination in its details; the difference is like comparing a fine oil painting to a crude computer graphic rendering. It has subtlety that forces the reader to pay attention. Wolfe messes with time and space, contemplates philosophical ideas, writes long exchanges whose import isn't immediately clear, and relies on the audience to make sense of the strange, slightly dreamlike events that unfold in the story, rather than spelling out how they're connected.

Without a doubt, this is a book that will absorb some readers and alienate others. Wolfe's ornate, college-level English, though not difficult, is not for everyone. Nor will everyone relate to the protagonist's detached, clinical voice. Basically, if you're looking for a light, Harry Potter-style book with instantly charismatic characters, you're better off going elsewhere. But, for readers who appreciate sophisticated writing and atmospheric, textured imaginary worlds, this is a great read.

93 of 103 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Rheba
  • United States
  • 02-20-12

I had forgotten how much I loved this series

I must have read the entire four-book series at some point in the 90s, and I recall that i was fascinated by the story. Fast forward to 2012. I accidentally happened upon the Shadow of the Torturer while perusing some books lists. Wow. I was very pleased to see that Audible has the entire series. The author has written a compelling story, combining sheer horror, symbolism, philosophy. Hearing Jonathan Davis's excellent narration of the author's beautiful prose is a pleasure.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Great reading of an intellectual masterpiece

Thought-provoking, image-rich and intricately plotted. This series has had a prized place on my bookshelf for years and I was thrilled to see it available as an audiobook. Even better, Jonathan Davis as narrator has a moderately slow (but not too slow) pace, great voice characterization, and handles the author's challenging and singular vocabular with ease.
Wolfe is subtle, profound writer and demands close attention from his readers/ listeners; this is not a surf-along novel. If your attention is distracted for a minute, you could miss something vital, and need to rewind -- I sometimes have had to do that as I listen. But most of the time I am completely engrossed. This is one of the best finds I've made, ever.
I hope to see more Wolfe audiobooks- beginning with this series' sequel/ continuance, "The Urth of the New Sun".

29 of 32 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Katherine
  • St. Johns, FL, United States
  • 09-11-10

It's time to read it this epic!

The Shadow of the Torturer introduces Severian, an orphan who grew up in the torturer's guild. Severian is now sitting on a throne, but in this first installment of The Book of the New Sun, he tells us of key events in his boyhood and young adulthood. The knowledge that Severian will not only survive, but will become a ruler, doesn't at all detract from the suspense; it makes us even more curious about how he will get there and what he experiences on the way.

What makes Gene Wolfe's epic different from everything else on the SFF shelf is his unique, evocative storytelling style. The reader isn't given all of the history and religion lessons (etc.) that are often dumped on us at the beginning of a fantasy epic. Rather, Severian's story is episodic and seems like it's meandering lazily, taking regular scenic detours, as if there's nowhere to go and plenty of time to get there. Because the story isn't a straight narrative, we don't understand the purpose or meaning of everything Severian relates ??? we have to patch it together as we go. By the end of the book, we're still clueless about most of it and we're starting to realize that Severian is kind of clueless, too. Much of the power of this novel comes from the sense that there is world-building and symbolism on a massive scale here, but that explanations and revelations for the reader would just cheapen it and remove the pleasure that comes from the experience of discovery.

In addition to being unique in style, The Shadow of the Torturer is a gorgeous piece of work: passionate storytelling (heart-wrenching in places), fascinating insights into nature and the human condition, beautiful prose.

20 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

An incredibly poetic writer.

Having read the New Sun books 25 years ago, I have to say that listening to them narrated by a truly great narrator made them even more enjoyable the second time around. Wolfes' writing is beautiful and hearing it in a different voice other than your own inner reading voice makes you appreciate his amazing ability to string words together, many of which he created for there rhythmic sound, in a melodic way which most authors can only dream of.

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

"All of you are torturers, one way or another"

The Shadow of the Torturer (1980), the first of the four books that comprise Gene Wolfe's science fiction masterpiece The Book of the New Sun, is a rich, moving, and challenging novel. Just in the first few chapters we learn that narrator Severian (who is writing his life story) was an orphan apprentice of the guild of torturers (the Seekers for Truth and Penitence) in the Citadel of sprawling Nessus (the City Imperishable) in the far future of Urth (earth?), under a dying sun; that the towers of the Citadel are long-derelict spaceships; that Severian has an eidetic memory; and that his youthful encounter with the rebel leader Vodalus set in motion events that will lead him to betray his guild, become an exile, and sit on the throne.

The novel is disturbing! There are glimpses of the appalling "excruciations" the guild performs upon its "clients," and many characters are afflicted with grief, including Severian, who is cursed to remember every detail of his sad experiences. But it is also funny, as in the eccentric and grotesque characters like Dr. Talos and Baldanders and the banter between Severian and Agia.

Severian's history is a demanding read. As in novels like A Voyage to Arcturus, everything seems to bear symbolic as well as narrative meaning. And Severian is not a completely reliable narrator, for he often lies and may be insane, and although he remembers everything, he selectively tells his story, at times eliding painful things and alluding to them later while narrating different events. And some things he recounts question the reality of his world (and ours).

Severian has much to say about reality, memory, history, story, art, culture, justice, religion, meaning, and love. Provocative lines punctuate his text. Symbols "invent us, we are their creatures, shaped by their hard, defining edges." Or "time turns our lies to truths." Or "the charm of words … reduces to manageable entities all the passions that would otherwise madden and destroy us."

Additionally, the richness of the novel's language, the elegance of its style, and the fertility of its imagination require slow savoring. In Severian's text common words rub shoulders with archaic or obscure ones, evoking the exotic texture of his world, as in names for officials (autarch, archon, castellan, chiliarch, lochage) and beasts of burden (dromedaries, oxen, metamynodons, onagers, hackneys).

Numerous descriptions yield shivers of pleasure: "She sighed, and all the gladness went out of her face, as the sunlight leaves the stone where a beggar seeks to warm himself." Or "Behind the altar rose a wonderful mosaic of blue, but it was blank, as if a fragment of sky without cloud or star had been torn away and spread upon the curving wall." Or "(A spell there was, surely, in this garden. I could almost hear it humming over the water, voices chanting in a language I did not know but understood.)"

Numerous scenes impress themselves on mind and heart, as when Severian visits the blind caretaker of the Borgesian library, finds a horribly wounded fighting dog, connects Thecla to the revolutionary, receives the black sword Terminus Est, falls into the Lake of Birds in the Garden of Everlasting Sleep, performs for the first time the mysteries of his guild's art, or witnesses a miracle with Dorcas.

Jonathan Davis adds so much to the novel with his witty and compassionate reading, modifying his voice to enhance each character without drawing attention to himself. And it's a pleasure to hear him relish Wolfe's beautiful prose or say words like anacreontic, carnifex, epopt, fuligin, fulgurator, hipparch, paracoita, and psychopomp. (Though it does help to have the text handy!)

At the end of The Shadow of the Torturer, Severian says he cannot blame his reader for refusing to follow him any more through his life, for "It is no easy road." Nevertheless, the next three novels reward the effort to read them manifold.

26 of 29 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Angela
  • Knoxville, TN, USA
  • 05-15-12

The character Jonathan Davis was born to play!

This book is the first part in a five part series, and only the first four books are available on Audible. I would say that this series is the story of the torturer's apprentice Severian, and his journey from lowest and most despised member of society to the throne, set in a far future Earth in which civilization and society are on a slow decline. I would say that, except that this is less a story and more a multi-dimensional mental jigsaw puzzle. The series requires that you, the listener, pay a great deal of attention to the plot, characters and vocabulary, and then listen to the whole thing all over again, possibly a few times, to get the richness, complexity and beauty of Gene Wolfe's vision. If you are prepared to make that kind of commitment, this is a great bargain as it will repay you in many hours of listening pleasure, getting better each time you listen again.

If you are not familiar with Gene Wolfe's work, you would probably be surprised to hear this series compared to Lord of the Rings. After all, how many stories can live up to that kind of comparison? Amazingly The Book of the New Sun series does, and in some ways exceeds it, as these are more adult stories with some added layers of complexity.

Audible really outdid themselves with this production. I can't imagine a finer narrator for this series than Jonathon Davis. His pacing, emphasis, vocal expressions and various character renderings are flawless. The pacing is particularly important, as nearly every sentence contains some clue to solving the final puzzle.

I hope the final book in the series, The Urth of the New Sun, will be available at some point. Although written a few years after the first four in the series, it fits in so well with the rest of the story and solves so many unanswered questions that it appears to have been planned all along.

18 of 20 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Breaks the Heart and Lifts it High

I've been a fan of The Book of the New Sun for 30 years, and was delighted that Audible took a chance and recorded it. Though its large and unfamiliar vocabulary may daunt listeners who have never read the text, those who persevere will know a world and a man unlike any other, and find them worth the knowing.

This was the first work of fantasy I read where such magic as it contained was the magic of Clarke's 3rd law: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." There are no dragons, sorcerers or wands, and the only sword is a blunt ended executioner's tool. The magic is in Wolfe's imagination as he builds a story set on an Earth so far in the future that the sun is dying, men mine the ruins of abandoned cities and their middens for raw materials, and so much has happened to the human race that legend and history have become interchangeable.

In this world, Wolfe sends Severian, the Torturer, on a hero's journey. As must be so on such a journey, the hero never knows himself as hero. Instead we live with his perils, his self doubt, his cowardice and courage, the terrible brutality and emotional blankness with which he practices his "art," and the discovery and growth that slowly reveal a magnificent heart. Severian is as flawed as the gem called the Claw of the Conciliator, and as real as your highest aspirations. You will not forget him, nor the many characters he meets on his journey from boyhood to a seat of power that proves to be both vast and impotent.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Darwin8u
  • Mesa, AZ, United States
  • 04-11-12

Original, Difficult and Well-Crafted.

I am almost anti-fantasy. I find most derivative at best and banal to the extreme. Wolfe's first book in his famous The Book of the New Sun tetralogy, however, is genre fiction at its finest. Original, difficult and well-crafted, it is easy to see how Wolfe is regarded as a writer's writer.

36 of 42 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • ely
  • Moscow, ID, United States
  • 01-18-11

Some examples of Wolfe's style—judge for yourself

There are plenty of helpful reviews here. I wanted to give the would-be listener a couple examples of Wolfe's writing style, which I chose nearly at random. The reason to read this book is for this style, which I found to be very lyrical and sharp, and not for plot or character. I thought the narrator was well-suited to this style, because he was slow and articulate--listen to the sample to see if you agree.

"We believe that we invent symbols. The truth is that they invent us; we are their creatures, shaped by their hard, defining edges. When soldiers take their oath they are given a coin, an asimi stamped with the profile of the Autarch. Their acceptance of that coin is their acceptance of the special duties and burdens of military life—they are soldiers from that moment, though they may know nothing of the management of arms. I did not know that then, but it is a profound mistake to believe that we must know of such things to be influenced by them, and in face to believe so is to believe in the most debased and superstitious kind of magic. The would-be sorcerer alone has faith in the efficacy of pure knowledge; rational people know that things act of themselves or not at all."

"I saw a caique, with high, sharp prow and stern, and a bellying sail, making south with the dark current; and against my will I followed it for a time—to the delta and the swamps, and at last to the flashing sea where that great beast Abaia, carried from the farther shores of the universe in anteglacial days, wallows until the moment comes for him and his kind to devour the continents."

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Peter
  • 08-09-10

Gene Wolfe's classic masterwork

Gene Wolfe's 4-volume 'Book of the New Sun' (5 volumes, when you add 'The Urth of the New Sun') is arguably one of the finest works of 20th century fiction, not just SF/fantasy. Like Jack Vance's 'Dying Earth' series (to which it respectfully nods), Wolfe sets his story so far in the future that SF and fantasy meld. Our own and subsequent ages survive only in garbled myth and archaeology. The story is beautifully written, and brims with stunning ideas, literary influences and inventiveness. Once appreciated, it lingers forever in the memory. On one level it can be read simply as a superior SF/fantasy story. However, new readers should be aware that it's much more tricksy than it first seems. Every sentence is carefully and deliberately crafted, the narrator can not always be relied on for accuracy, characters are often much more than they seem, and what appear to be inconsequential details assume huge significance later in the work. It repays multiple re-readings in a way few works do. If you get to the end and have enjoyed it, track down 'Solar Labyrinth' by Robert Borski and 'Lexicon Urthus' by Michael Andre-Driussi, and prepare to be gob-smacked and delighted by what you've missed. Then re-read it from the beginning!

The narration is high quality and admirably serves the series. Just the right amount of voice characterisation without 'over acting'. Bravo audible!

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Stephen
  • 04-03-10

Very, very good

I've been waiting and hoping that Wolfe's Book of the New Sun would get an audiobook version. In terms of the original text Wolfe's work stands alongside that of Tolkien and Herbert, among the greatest and most rewarding of authors, one whose profound work repays the reader in direct proportion to their own effort. Now we get to listen to this lengthy meditation on love, memory and identity...and what a listen it is!

The narration is smooth and measured and fits very well the tone and tempo of the book in my opinion. The complexity of Severian's character and the original text are well-served by Jonathon Davis and I would heartily recommend this to any fan of Wolfe. And if you're not already a fan of Wolfe this just might change your mind.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Anton
  • 04-03-10

Fantastic

This is the first volume of the "Book of the New Sun". Wherever I read about this book before, I read that it is SF. I am not sure how to call it myself. There are a lot of surprising turns in the story. After listening to a third of it, I was convinced it is an unusual piece of fantasy; but then the story developed into something completely fantastic, full of symbolism, almost bizarre. For me, this book has more in common with the novels of E.T.A Hoffmann and the German romanticists of the early 19th century than with either SF or modern fantasy. The narration is excellent. Among the best I have listened to in the last year. If you have read something about Gene Wolfe, then you know about his frequent use of obscure words. But this was not as big a problem as I feared. My dictionary was not much help, though, and I had some opportunity to use the OED (unabridged) at my office. But this is extra fun, and you don't need to do this for following the story. I just downloaded the second volume of the series: "The Claw of the Conciliator".

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Midwinter Dog Star
  • 08-23-17

Excellent

I've loved this book since I first read it. It's sometimes beautiful, often disturbing, dark, complex, cryptic and fascinating. This is an excellent recording of it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Dr
  • 03-27-16

Science fantasy at its best

After having finished M John Harrison's excellent Viriconium sequence, I grew worried that I'd never find a science fantasy title to match it for scope, imagination and sheer poetry. How glad I am then that I stumbled, quite by accident, on Gene Wolfe's highly acclaimed Book of the New Sun. The publisher's blurb lead me to expect a work to rival Tolkien in its scope and, for once, they weren't exaggerating, for Wolfe's prose leaves Tolkien standing, and the breadth of his imagination makes middle earth seem like a tame and tedious sort of place. What makes this even better are the good production values of the recording (it's odd how much atmosphere a bit of music at the start and end can lend an audiobook), and the intelligence and pathos of Jonathan Davis's performance. This is a very rich text, and Davis captures its many nuances perfectly. I have already purchased the remaining three volumes of the series, and hope they live up to the high standards set by The Shadow of the Torturer.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • E. Nolan
  • 09-14-15

The language in this book is beautiful

The book is beautifully written and the narrator does it great justice. This series is a classic that will still be read decades hence.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Mark
  • 06-11-13

Dark and dreamy

There are plenty of reviews to suggest the quality of this work but I would single out the narration as one of the best matched to the story I have come across in listening to 100+ Audiobooks.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Rowan Litobarski
  • 05-25-13

Highly Unusual and Gripping Speculative Fiction

It's a hard task to make a protagonist a torturer, and yet Gene Wolfe creates the perfectly memorable character of Severian. One of the most unique characters to have merged in fiction and a truly engaging storyline, that works on several levels. It certainly has an almost dreamlike quality to it and like reading a historical diary, you come away wondering if what was recounted was a description of the actual events of the story or a highly biased and conflicting version as Severian, is if nothing else, a highly unreliable narrator.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • daniel
  • 04-07-13

darkly beautiful

This series has always been one of my all time favourites....a beautifully written saga set a million years in the future when our sun is dying and the eons of history preceding this story have faded beyond myth.Wolfe crafts a tale that works on numerous levels,indeed this novel has been voted a SF masterwork and its obvious why.just buy it,you wont be disappointed I promise...a magical experience

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Mirenda Rosenberg
  • 01-20-12

Captivating - took me a while to get into the book

It took me a while to get into this book. I listen to audio-books while driving/walking/cleaning etc, and I found my attention drifting during the first hour (or so) of this book. However, once got to know Severian - once I gained a strong impression of who he was and the complications of his life - I was hooked. Every character is interesting, even the smallest peripheral characters are well developed. I strongly recommend this book and the rest of the series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • tom
  • 08-23-17

it's Gaiman-esque

a lucid and beautiful piece of sci fi fantasy this series is a piece of art that didn't always make sense but it always made me think.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Simon Mierendorff
  • 04-01-15

Beautifully written

I have never before read (or rather heard) such vivid and intricately imaginative writing. Wolfe builds a phenomenal world without insulting the reader, and in so doing (by the use of the narrator) creates one of the most fully realized characters and intriguing universes I have ever come to know.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • philip barnes
  • 06-28-16

terrible

the story jumps about all over the place. there is no explanation of any of the main themes and the set piece battle is over a an inconsequential attempted theft. plus the wishering of the narration adds to the garbling tale. ill have a refund, the first from audible.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful