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Publisher's Summary

In 1951 John Wyndham published The Day of the Triffids to moderate acclaim. Fifty-two years later, this horrifying story is a science fiction classic, touted by The Times (London) as having "all the reality of a vividly realized nightmare."

Bill Masen, bandages over his wounded eyes, misses the most spectacular meteorite shower England has ever seen. Removing his bandages the next morning, he finds masses of sightless people wandering the city. He soon meets Josella, another lucky person who has retained her sight, and together they leave the city, aware that the safe, familiar world they knew a mere 24 hours before is gone forever. But to survive in this post-apocalyptic world, one must survive the Triffids, strange plants that years before began appearing all over the world. The Triffids can grow to over seven feet tall, pull their roots from the ground to walk, and kill a man with one quick lash of their poisonous stingers. With society in shambles, they are now poised to prey on humankind. Wyndham chillingly anticipates bio-warfare and mass destruction, 50 years before their realization, in this prescient account of Cold War paranoia.

©1951 John Wyndham; (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

Critic Reviews

  • Audie Award Nominee - Best Sci-Fi/Fantasy Audiobook, 2011

“The best what-if sci-fi ever.” (Lee Child)

"Graeme Malcolm creates the atmosphere of a classic Twilight Zone or Chiller Theatre production.... Malcolm’s tone of steady perseverance contributes to the realism of the plot." (AudioFile)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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Performance

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Story

  • 4.3 out of 5.0
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NOT unabridged.

Any additional comments?

This version is abridged. Not by the industry standard HUGE amount, but maybe as much as 25% of the writing has been taken out. It is as if the book were 'tightened up' by an editor who didn't realize how much brilliant social commentary was between the lines of Wyndham's digressions. The BBC has done an unabridged reading of this, as has (i think) Books On Tape. Both are better than this one by a long shot--and they are complete.

37 of 39 people found this review helpful

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A weed in the realm of scifi

Interesting concept,well delivered-but it sounds like a drawn out episode of The Outer Limits..is there a sequel?*why not*

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

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Decent story, much borrowed from

Not an example of great literature, but certainly enjoyable.
It seems that the writers of The Walking Dead and and others of the same genre have taken much from Day of the Triffids.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Surprisingly good

I recalled seeing the 1962 movie version as a teenager and had rather low expectation based on its typical monsters run amok plotline, But needing an easy read over vacation, I took a chance and was happily rewarded with well developed characters and situations. A scifi novel that holds up well even after all these years.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

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Starts great but then it sorta just drags on

STORY (sci-fi) - This book was written in the early fifties and is very well done. It was probably quite unique and shocking in its time but not so much today in 2014. The story begins with a very unique premise -- a meteor shower, people who have become blind, the triffids. (They're huge plants that can walk and kill people with a stinger thingy). Shortly after I became acquainted with the characters and the situation, however, I began losing interest. The story basically becomes one of meandering the English countryside, trying to find food and shelter while avoiding triffids and disease.

PERFORMANCE - The narrator is male and has a British accent. He does a good job, though nothing special.

OVERALL - No sex, cursing or graphic violence. There is quite a bit of death and disease, but I didn't find it gross or depressing. Both men and women might enjoy this story, but it's definitely not for children. The book comes to a satisfactory conclusion but the door is left open for the story to continue. At the very end the narrator mentions another book which can be purchased if you want to continue the saga. The Day of the Triffids is highly rated and was nominated for an award within the past few years, so you might want to give it a try despite my comments.

12 of 14 people found this review helpful

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End of the world with some non-standard monsters

Would you consider the audio edition of The Day of the Triffids to be better than the print version?

I have not read the print version, but I suspect they would be about on par.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

Most interesting: The concept of a blind populace mixed with a stealthy predator.<br/><br/>Least interesting: Probably the breakdown in vivid detail of what is required to keep the population alive. It gets tedious after a time.

Have you listened to any of Graeme Malcolm’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

This is my first experience with him and found him to be very much up to the task.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

If we could edit out the duller bits, then yes, as is - not really.

Any additional comments?

Don't get me wrong. It's an interesting story, albeit a depressing one. The end of the world as we know it tends to do that. It is slow/dull toward the beginning as the step by step process the characters do is followed. Once they leave London, things pick up.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Killer plants, as pets??

One thing that always bothers me in these books where there are Zombies, Aliens or Killer Plants invading the earth, why do these authors believe humans will sit by and do nothing. First we have these plants that kill and blind people and then eat them. According to this author we will make pets of them. It takes two years of these plants multiplying and ganging up to kill whole towns before somebody thinks we should start hunting them down.

I don't know about England, but in gun loving America these things would have become a National sport day one.

We also have these Meteors that blind people. The author does not seem to recognize that half of the world is in daylight while the other half is in dark. We are lead to believe the whole world is blinded in one night.

Then when most everyone is blinded, they start killing themselves. An eighteen year old beauty who is blind offers herself to a man if he will help take care of her. He is to proper for that, but he does help her take pills to kill her self. A young couple throws themselves out a window. Blind people are considered totally helpless.

The book is well written and there are some very good parts, it is just a little depressing on how down the author is on mankind.

32 of 40 people found this review helpful

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Perfect post-apocalyptic novel

First, I thought it ended rather abruptly. I actually expected I was half way through the book when it ended. So that was somewhat disappointing that it was over. Nonetheless, I wouldn't have been disappointed if I hadn't been enjoying it so much. It's a really good book, full of all the concepts and situations I like in a good post-apocalyptic novel. It's realistic, exciting, and the narrative is practically prose. The writer is extraordinarily articulate and well-spoken. Quite the opposite of the some of the more recent post-apocalyptic/survivalist novels which sound like a how-to manual being read. Highly recommended. I just finished Earth Abides, and although the stories begin quite similarly, they diverge enough to be mutually enjoyable, even if you read them in succession. I should also say that the reader is excellent and perfectly matched to the content.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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A Cautionary Tale Ahead of its Time

I have loved this story for a long time. It was great to hear an audio version. The message seems so appropriate today in a world of genetic engineering, space defense systems, biological warfare, and intentional introduction of invasive of foreign plant and animal species. Every time I hear tapping sticks, I wonder if a triffid has arrived at my door. The BBC did a wonderful television production in the mid-80s. The production values are quite simple compared to today's but it is very effective.

10 of 13 people found this review helpful

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Great Story

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes, I would. I'd only ever seen the 1960s film Day of the Triffids, and was curious to hear the original.

What other book might you compare The Day of the Triffids to and why?

I don't have a comparison for The Day of the Triffids.

What does Graeme Malcolm bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He has a rich, wonderful voice which added to the story which is staged in Britain.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

No, but I did really enjoy it.

Any additional comments?

I look forward to reading other John Wyndham works.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful