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Publisher's Summary

Brutha is the Chosen One. His god has spoken to him, admittedly while currently in the shape of a tortoise.

Brutha is a simple lad. He can't read. He can't write. He's pretty good at growing melons. And his wants are few.

He wants to overthrow a huge and corrupt church. He wants to prevent a horribly holy war. He wants to stop the persecution of a philosopher who has dared to suggest that, contrary to the Church's dogma, the Discworld really does go through space on the back of an enormous turtle. (Which is true, but when has that ever mattered?) He wants peace and justice and brotherly love. He wants the Inquisition to stop torturing him now, please.

But most of all, what he really wants, more than anything else, is for his god to choose someone else...

Please note: This is a vintage recording. The audio quality may not be up to modern day standards.

©1992 Terry Pratchett and Lynn Pratchett; (P)1997 ISIS Publishing Ltd.

Critic Reviews

"Pratchett is the funniest parodist working in the field today, period." (The New York Review of Science Fiction)
"Terry Pratchett is simply the best humorous writer of the 20th century. Wodehouse, Waugh, Sharpe, etc. all have their merits, sometimes considerable, but Pratchett really is a cut above the rest." (Oxford Times)

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Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.6 out of 5.0
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Performance

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Story

  • 4.7 out of 5.0
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  • Overall

Enjoyable

I thought this went on a tiny bit longer than it needed to, but overall I was very impressed. I loved Pratchett's sense of humor and enjoyed the narration very much. I have never read (or listened to) any other Pratchett novels in this series, and I didn't feel that hindered my understanding or enjoyment of this one.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • D
  • 03-19-09

More Transparently Cerebral, Flawlessly Executed

If you're coming to "Small Gods" from nearly any other Pratchett Series it may fee 'slower'; Pratchett is tackling Organized Religion here, and not in his usual appetizer portions: this is breakfast, lunch, and dinner and it takes a little more time to set the table, but never at the expense of Pratchett's trademark humor, insight, and wit.

I, too, felt this was slow; until I realized it just wasn't as manic as Pratchett's other books.

There are not only no familiar characters here (except the Librarian and Death), but there are fewer characters in general and, for a fair portion of the book there are only two making their way through the desert engaged, for the most part, in conversation.

And this is where Pratchett shows his chops: no dwarfs, no trolls asking "what be a safety catch?" No carnivorous luggage, no zombies, no wizards, no nac mac feegles; yet long after I had finished "Small Gods' I found myself thinking about the characters in this book, how they suffered, changed, and grew, and pondering the story's insights long after I had put space between me and 'Small Gods' with a number of other Pratchett greats.

I listened to 'Small Gods' again, and it was even better. and no less funny.

Come on: Planer as a self-absorbed God trapped in the body of a tortoise? This is a very, very funny book. Through and through. I not only think this is Pratchett at his best, I think this is the place Pratchett most likes to be.

I've probably converted half a dozen literary snobs to Pratchett and "Small Gods" is where I start.

14 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Perfect narration for a perfect book

Small Gods should be considered one of the greatest books of all time. Terry Pratchett is our modern day Mark Twain, using satire to comment on the state of 'civlization' and also bringing the thinking man or woman a great laugh. The narrator, a regular on the unabridged Pratchett circuit is perfectly matched to this work!

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • Ilana
  • Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • 03-31-15

A Great Place to Start!

Brutha is a novice who works in the garden and is happy to provide melons for the monks who work at the temple, and is also happy enough to stay away from Vorbis, the head Inquisitor and his followers, until the day he somehow comes into Vorbis's notice. He has no idea how this can be and is sure he's in for terrible torture and a very painful death. He doesn't know how to read or write, so what else could Vorbis want with him? But it so happens Brutha has an incredible memory and can't forget a thing, and Vorbis does indeed intend to make good use of him for political purposes. Meanwhile, the Great God Om has appeared to Brutha in the garden in the form of a small turtle who seems to be able to speak only to Brutha, for nobody else can hear him. But how is this possible? Om the Great, Om the Almighty, in whose name Vorbis and the Quisition have been taking countless lives... in the form of a basically powerless turtle?!

My fist journey into Terry Pratchett's Discworld is a great parody on certain forms of organised religion, the Inquisition and religious wars, and made for a terribly enjoyable read. I'm not sure all the Discworld books will be to my liking, but it certainly makes me want to discover others and I'll definitely want to return to this one— adding it to my pile of favourites of the year!

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Pratchett+Planer

Nigel Planer reads Terry Pratchett -- it doesn't get much better than this. "Small Gods" is one of my favorite Pratchett books. It has the humor and thoughtfulness that are the hallmarks of his best works.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

A book you don't want to end.

I loved the storyline, but the performance is one of the best I've ever heard. It's really sat with me and has me reinventing the way I narrate in my own head.

The story is gripping and entertaining- your attention is held even during a journey through a desert. I'm really hoping that the rest of the author's books are just as good. 100% recommend it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Ryan
  • Somerville, MA, United States
  • 09-07-10

great intro to Pratchett

People have been recommending Pratchett books to me for a decade and a half, but I never got around to picking one up until now (after Stephen King, I'm a bit leary of prolific authors). I have to say, I enjoyed this one: Monty Python's Life of Brian meets Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, with a little more of a plot. The humor is more light-hearted and irreverent than-laugh-out-loud funny, but Pratchett's thoughts on theology and the excesses of religion (including anti-religion) have an underlying substance that gets the reader to think. Highly quotable, especially if you're a Unitarian. Can anyone recommend another good Pratchett book?

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Absolutely hilarious

This was my first book of the discworld series and I'm excited there's so many more. I checked this out after good omens and this is easily one of my favorites now. The satirical take on gods and humans coupled with the authors humor made for some hilarious interactions.

The narration was really well done. He made every character stand out and I especially enjoyed his voice for ohm. You definitely get a different experience listening to the narrators tone and take on the characters voices than when you read it. Worth a listen even if you've already read it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Better than average but average for Pratchett

I love the discworld series.
If you love it too, then get this one - but save it till you run out of other options.
Terry Pratchett is brilliant and there are some amusing theological comments but somehow the story is not as engaging as his others and the characters (not used in the other books) are not as memorable.
But - if you've heard all the others and need a discworld fix - then addiction makes it satisfy.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Best of the Discworld

Small Gods is Terry Pratchett at his best. This is my personal favorite and I also think it's one of his best. Unlike some of the other Discworld books, Small Gods has a coherent and interesting story all the way though, and the jokes stay fresh throughout. (Don't get me wrong--I love all the books.)

This Discworld novel is largely a [hilarious] commentary on religion. It does not have a strong anti-religion tone, but rather portrays how a religion can become removed from the god it worships such that in an entire institution only one true believer remains (and they god is but thrilled about it).

Out of the ~40 Discworld books this is stand-alone story and can be read out of context--you'd only miss out on a few references to the rest of the series. If you do read it first then just remember that the world is indeed flat, and does in fact sit upon the backs of four elephants, which in turn stand on the shell of a giant turtle.

AUDIBLE 20 REVIEW SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY

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  • Kate
  • 06-26-06

Marvellous miniture theology

Small Gods is perhaps one of the neatest and most complete feeling Disc World books. Carrying at it's core a mixture of dark satire and genuine theology, the story of blundering Bruther's involuntary venture into the nature and origin of religion is highly entertaining. The characterisation of the Great God Om as a grumpy one eyed tortoise more preoccupied with his own survival than with the welbeing of his followers is genius. This book promises that you will never look at a tortoise in quite the same way again, (Well, not without thinking, 'There's good eating on one of them', anyway).

1 of 1 people found this review helpful