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Publisher's Summary

This is the third installment of John Norman's popular and controversial Gor series. Tarl Cabot is the intrepid tarnsman of the planet Gor, a harsh society with a rigid caste system that personifies the most brutal form of Social Darwinism. In this volume, Tarl must search for the truth behind the disappearance of his beautiful wife, Talena. Have the ruthless Priest-Kings destroyed her? Tarl vows to find the answer for himself, journeying to the mountain stronghold of the kings, knowing full well that no one who has dared approach the Priest-Kings has ever returned alive....

The saga continues: listen to more in the Gorean series.
©1968 John Norman (P)2010 Brilliance Audio, Inc.

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 4.2 out of 5.0
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A challange to the imagination

This is as much as a new experience to the imagination as was the first volume. IN the first we learned the nature of Gor on the surface, both literally and figuratively. Now we get to the inner workings. This volume has a focus on more action and less face and body stripping. Well worth the read, and a focal point of the whole series.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Bruce
  • Knoxville, MD, United States
  • 08-11-11

One of my all-time favorite books.

I have always loved this book. It gets 5 stars and I don't give those out very often.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Finally!

We finally discover the true nature of the Priest Kings, and it is well worth the wait.

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They're Giant Arthropods?!

Priest-Kings of Gor makes an excellent third volume in the Gorean Saga. This particular book in the series is much more sci-fi oriented, with high tech alien battle scenes and alien-created synthetic humans. If you’re like me, you didn’t see the revelation that Priest-Kings were giant arthropods coming. I expected them to be human-like in appearance, which made for quite an interesting twist in the story.

Priest-Kings of Gor picks up right where Outlaw of Gor left off. Tarl Cabot arrives at the foot of the Sardar Mountains, releases his tarn, and enters through the gate that allows access to the domain of the Priest-Kings. Once inside, he’s held captive for some time in a special type of prison cell with a slave girl named Vika. Unbeknownst to Tarl, Vika has been tasked by the Priest-King Sarm to woo him in an effort to convince him to kill the Priest-King’s brother, Misk. Vika fails in her task and Tarl is taken in by Misk, where he learns all about Priest-Kings.

Priest-Kings are a technologically advanced race of large insects that brought Gor to our solar system over two million years ago when their sun began to die. Priest-Kings are primarily concerned with technological advancement, particularly as it relates to increasing their longevity. Ironically enough, this has caused their species to dwindle to less than a thousand. Most Priest-Kings in the Nest on Gor are sexless. There is only one female in the Nest, the Mother, and she has supreme authority. That authority, however, is being usurped by her first-born, the Priest-King Sarm. Sarm wants to prevent new male and female Priest-Kings from being born so that he can maintain his political power in the Nest. Human slaves assist the Priest-Kings in their various tasks and are considered part of the Next, that is, easily dispensable parts. It’s not really revealed why the Priest-Kings have populated Gor with various species. What is explained is that they intentionally limit the humans’ technological advancement out of fear for their own safety.

Misk informs Tarl that he was brought to the nest of the Priest-Kings in a secret conspiracy between himself and the Mother to overthrow Sarm. That’s why his city was destroyed and his people scattered, to keep Sarm in the dark about their true intentions. He wants Tarl’s help finding a female egg that was hidden among the Wagon People. Tarl reluctantly agrees, which Sarm suspects, resulting in a war between the two. The human slaves in the Nest revolt during the confrontation and join Misk’s rebellion against Sarm. Sarm is killed and Gor and the Nest are nearly destroyed in the process. With the Priest-Kings temporarily out of commission, Tarl sets out on a new journey to find the egg among the Wagon People.

John Norman is an excellent science fiction writer and the battle scenes in this book leave nothing to be desired on that front. I was on the edge of my seat throughout much of the story as the plot just kept getting more and more interesting. Norman’s humor really shows when he introduces us to pair of synthetically created twins and details their secret shenanigans within the Nest. The low ratings this series has received are simply unmerited and probably socially/politically motivated. Some people just can’t wrap their heads around the concept of fantasy. I’m looking forward to the next book. I also recommend purchasing the audiobook narrated by Ralph Lister. He does an excellent job narrating the various characters and really makes the story come alive.

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My favorite so far

I'm growing to really love the Gor series and this is my favorite so far. The intricacies of plot between the classic tribal culture of Gor and the introduction of priest-kings and their technology culture is and intriguing juxtaposition.

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decent but annoying character voice

I hate his robotic voice for the mechanical translators. it was hard to listen to so much of it.

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Getting mad, even though revenge is nigh.

The narrator (Ralph Lister) really pulls off an excellent performance. Going from believable women, the computer voice sounding like robot and several different specific characters. John Norman's Gor novels holds no punches when it comes to plot progression and really invokes several different emotions, sometimes even angry. Though, in true John Norman fashion, the hero wins the day, "gets the beautiful woman" and all hopes are realized. There's no lingering questions, for everything is explained and resolved. I am the type of person who likes epic fantasy novels that go into great detail concerning everything. John Norman's writing style just flows from one scene to the next while going into enough detail to satisfy the reader. So far this series has been fantastic. 3 down, 30 more to go. Haha. I would recommend this series to ANY fan of science fiction with a heavy dose of action.

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  • michael
  • WOODVILLE, OHIO, United States
  • 03-04-13

Gorean Saga

The Gorean series is basically Conan the barbarian meets a smut novel on another world. There's lots of violent battles and vicious giant man eaters with a dash BDSM. The series gets a little repetitive as the books go on but not to badly for a 20 plus book series. If you liked the John Carter in 'A Princess of Mars' series most likely you'll enjoy these books there very similar. I prefer the Gorean series myself, except the ones narrated by women which I haven't bought so don't know if there good or not I personal dislike women narrates.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Roy
  • Burlington, IA, United States
  • 04-09-12

I am HOOKED

If there was a literary equivalent to "crack"... this series is it. I need more!

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • James
  • 12-10-12

MORE GOREAN SAGA PLEASE!!

Well read by Ralph again here, makes a decent book better....Please Audible, more Gor Saga please!!!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Justique
  • 03-21-16

gor once again

See my review of the second book. thought this book was just so silly i couldent handle it

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  • Peter
  • 02-13-15

disappointing

I could only struggled through half, it started going wrong with the tedious minutiae of objects slightly differing from real world objects, going into far more detail than necessary. Then it moves into an hour or so of characters with monotonous and abrasive voices (I appreciate that this was correct though). Worst was the author's portrayal of how women act on gor, and his attempts to rationalise their submissive behaviour. I understand that this is his fantasy, a world he created, but I could not perservere through the rest of this book as I found it rather sickening.

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  • Miss Zowie A Mansfield
  • 01-09-15

Totally addictive

Every moment left my craving the next. Such an intiguing insight into a what if theory.