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Publisher's Summary

Life in America a generation from now isn't much different from today: The drugs are better, the daily grind is worse. The gap between the rich and the poor has widened to a chasm. You can store the world's legal knowledge on a chip in your little finger, while the Supreme Court has decreed that constitutional rights don't apply to any individual who challenges the system. Justice is swiftly delivered by automated courts, so the prison industry is booming. And while the media declare racism is dead, word on the street is that even in a colorless society, it's a crime to be black.

But the world still turns, and folks still have to get by with the hands they're dealt, folks such as:

Ptolemy "Popo" Bent: This gentle backwoods child has a genius I.Q.- and a soul so pure that officials want him locked up forever.

Folio Johnson: A hardboiled, cyber-augmented private eye who can see beneath the dark poetry of the metropolis, he will need an even greater edge than that to find out who's systematically murdering rich, young Nazis.

Fera Jones: She's the boxing Queen of the Ring who must still fight all comers to save her dad, preserve her identity, and protect the fans who believe in her.

Dr. Ivan Kismet: The world's richest man, Macrocode's CEO is a tycoon, tyrant, and messiah who is evidently more powerful than God. So it's too bad for everyone that Dr. Kismet is utterly insane.

Walter Mosley brings to life the celebs, working stiffs, leaders, victims, technocrats, crooks, oppressors, and revolutionaries who inhabit a glorious all-American nightmare that's just around the corner. Welcome to Futureland.

©2004 Walter Mosley; (P)2004 Brilliance Audio, Inc.

Critic Reviews

"Ably slinging the technobabble to explain the odd wonder-gadgets in his tales, and greasing them with plenty of 'oh-baby' sex, Mosley creates sf in which Shaft and Superfly would feel at home. Can ya dig it?" (Booklist)
"Nine science-fiction short stories of a high order....Richard Allen does an excellent job replicating various African American dialects and manages to inject a sense of excitement and anticipation." (Library Journal)

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 3.7 out of 5.0
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    34
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    7

Performance

  • 3.7 out of 5.0
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    22
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    14
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    17
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    5
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Story

  • 3.5 out of 5.0
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Sort by:
  • Overall
  • Stephen
  • Kensington, MD, United States
  • 08-31-10

Masterful SciFi from a master of mystery

I've been out of Science Fiction for many years, but an Easy Rawlins fan for many years since then. Thought I'd give this a try. After the first few stories, I was tempted to abandon the book: too dark and dystopian. But I stuck with it, and so should you. Mosley, like all good SciFi authors, creates a unique and real world. In this case, a rather frightening one, but intriguing. His mind/machine/spirit concept is uplifting, for lack of a better word. His characters are real and compelling, as you would expect from the man who created Easy and his corner of the world. Readers who stay to the end will be rewarded by the return of earlier characters, an increasingly fuller explanation of the world, and the possibility of redemption. This book is well worth your time. I hope Mosley brings back some of the people that he created here.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Peregrine
  • Los Angeles, CA, United States
  • 12-26-08

Solid sci-fi with a Black theme

Mosley does for dystopic Sci-Fi what he did for period mystery novels: give it the Black American perspective lacking in most of the genre. The nine stories interweave into an entertaining, patchwork novel of sorts. I liked the more or less happy endings in many of the stories.

The reader does a fine job, too.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • David
  • Salt Lake City, UT, USA
  • 08-05-08

Excellent story

I really enjoyed this story, which is a set of 9 short stories set in the same universe. The characters have real emotions and common motivations that drive the stories in a futuristic setting where the lines of personal identity and human rights get blurred. This story is similar to William Gibson's Neuromancer or Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash as it often deals with the underside of humanity, the people living on the fringe, trying to make their way in a technologically disadvantaged setting. However there is often a strong mixing of racial tension, radical feminism or class disparity that gives each story a unique feel from Gibson or Stephenson. Don't let this scare you away though, this is an excellent read with many thought provoking ideas as technology becomes more integrated into the main populace.

8 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story
  • J. Hudson
  • Marietta, Georgia United States
  • 02-09-17

Uncle Remis meets the future.

I couldn't finish it. There was too little plot and too much dialog. And this book is not worth fifteen words

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

horrible narration

I tried to start each chapter, but the narrator was terrible. I just couldn't get through it.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Hard to understand what they saying

I start to listen to this book but I couldn't understand what they was saying. I try to listen but it's a no go for me, I stop right after the second chapter started, so that's why I gave a low review. It was a waste of a credit for me

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Great book

I loved this collection of connected short stories! The only problem is that it ends too soon!
Hope to read more about this facinating world he created!

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Couldn't finish it

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

I think that the content of this book was uninteresting. I was expecting something a bit more futuristic and a lot less graphic.

Would you ever listen to anything by Walter Mosley again?

No, I don't like his writing style.

Would you be willing to try another one of Richard Allen’s performances?

No, I could barely understand what he was saying, it took too much concentration to listen.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Disappointment and horror.

  • Overall
  • Performance
  • Story

Someone with a chip on their shoulder wrote this

This is a series of short stories all tied together with some of the same characters popping up as we are taken forward into the future. This story is told from the perspective of African American's living a future where it is very rare to own more then a few personal possessions.

Corporations own almost all real property. Gifted children are taken from parents and sent to special schools where their gifts can be developed "for the good of society." Prisons are run by corporations that make their money by performing medical and psychological experiments on prisoners. Work is rationed out and the unemployed are banished to underground ghettos.

I am not a fan of stories that carry a "social message." I read and listen to books to be entertained, not lectured. The message carried all through out this book is that working people, even in the future, are still being held down and abused by rich people. If that is your cup of tea, this book is for you.

On the technical side, I found the narrator's heavy use of poor southern dialect and slang very hard to understand in the first part of the first short story. However, that got better after the first few minutes.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful