Saint Thomas Aquinas

Narrated by: Derek Perkins
Length: 5 hrs and 27 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (355 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"You call him a Dumb Ox; I tell you that the Dumb Ox will bellow so loud that his bellowing will fill the world." (Albertus Magnus)

Dubbed the "Dumb Ox" by his classmates for his shyness, Saint Thomas Aquinas proved to be possessed of the rarest brilliance, justifying the faith of his teacher, Albertus Magnus, and sparking a revolution in Christian thought. Chesterton's unsurpassed examination of Aquinas' thinking makes his philosophy accessible to listeners of any generation.

Etienne Gilson, the 20th century's foremost authority on Aquinas, has said of this work, "I consider it as being without possible exception the best book ever written on Saint Thomas. Nothing short of genius can account for such an achievement."

Public Domain (P)2015 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about Saint Thomas Aquinas

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Best book on Thomas in English

Chesterton's book is a brilliant picture of St. Thomas Aquinas. He does a masterful job of showing you Thomas the man, The Saint, The friar, and the theologian, all against the backdrop of a remarkable picture of the 13th century. It is hard to imagine a book about the Middle Ages Star in one of the most notoriously difficult philosophers to read, being a page turner that you can't put down, but that is exactly what Chesterton gives us. It is worth noting that almost all the great Thomist scholars of the 20th century, philosophers such as Jacques Maritain and Etienne Gilson, all commend Chesterton's book is the single best book to read about Thomas.

15 people found this helpful

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Another Chesterton's masterpiece

G K Chesterton never disappoints. Even a short book like this one is worth reading

4 people found this helpful

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I finally get Chesterton

I have tried reading and listening to Chesterton for years but I never liked his work. I finished this book because I finally realized why I struggled with his other works. He babbles as someone would in a conversation and he does this babbling in a 19th century British style. For theses 21 century American ears, I struggled with it but now that I know what he is doing, I can know that at times it will take him a while to get to the point.

I have recently discovered Aquinas and everyone recommended this book. There are many insight to his life I learned for the first time.

The last two chapters were a struggle for me. It seems God did not bless me with a philosopher's mind.

I am looking forward to learning more about Aquinas and therefore about God.

3 people found this helpful

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Shows the Character and Philosophy of Aquinas

Chesterton does a great job revealing Aquinas' character as a man of God, and as a Man purposefully immersed in His work. Chesterton also does a good analysis on the immediate AND far reaching effect of the heavyweight philosopher.

This book does not reveal the theology of Aquinas, as said so by Chesterton himself. Those who read this book for only the dogma and theology of Aquinas will be let down. But those who can attach the philosophy of Aquinas to the theology of the time will not be disappointed.

Chestertons' added opinions are helpful and informative when it comes to understanding Aquinas, though when Chesterton grazes Reformed and Augustinian theology, he certainly shows an understandable ignorance, and misinforms the reader about the Augustinian and Reformed positions. I'm sure if Chesterton had the same passion for Augustine or Calvin, he would be more informed. I don't hold it against Chesterton though, those theologians are clearly not Chesterton's field of study.

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Dense and Difficult to Understand

Chesterton’s writing style is dense and difficult to understand for most modern readers. I have no doubt that his logic and philosophy and theology are sound. But for every one idea that made its way into my conscience I’m sure there were 10 others that did not make it in because the language was so inaccessible to me.

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A literal labyrinth

The book is incredible. The perplexity and thoughtful are upon sheer cliffs Elevated beyond the common material of this age. A tremendous exercise in mental fitness, indeed.

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GK Chesterton is God

GK Chesterton will change the world. This book is difficult to get through, but GK is always worth it no matter what.

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Great Read on St Thomas

One of the best testimony of Being as the changeless background behind all change...the great I AM...

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This book should be called: GK Chesterton’s musings about life inspired by Saint Thomas Aquinas

While I find other works by GK Chesterton to be insightful and written with great eloquence, this book has no sense of purpose related to the title. The author doesn’t give any sense of the story of the Saint’s life and merely makes many assertions about what Aquinas’ writings are all about. Sadly these assertions are mostly generalizations and complaints about people and even civilizations that Saint Thomas would never have known because they have nothing to do with the context or situation in the Middle Ages. I didn’t count, but I think he only actually quotes the actual recorded words of the prolific Saint a couple of times. So this book is neither about Aquinas’ life nor a summary of what he said, or even what he believed.

This book is at best a series of musing by the author who seems to greatly admire the Saint, but cannot for the life of him, bring himself to actually say anything solid.

If anyone has a book that’s actually about Saint Thomas Aquinas, I’d love to read it because this one isn’t.

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great book, great performance, amazing story.

i needed to slow it down and listen more then once to get used to Chesterton's style, but it was well worth it!