Your audiobook is waiting…

SEEDS: The Journey Begins

Seeds Trilogy, Book 1 (Revised Edition)
Narrated by: Cary Allen Stone
Series: Seeds Trilogy [Stone], Book 1
Length: 4 hrs and 35 mins
5 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

OR
In Cart

Publisher's Summary

SEEDS: The Journey Begins is filled with the enlightenment of a scientific age in which the best scientists in their field have carte blanche to aid space exploration and colonization. But the race to save humanity is not all celebration. 

A nuclear holocaust kills all life on Earth. The ship leaves just in time. There is not only an analytical perspective in this story but a strong emotional one. 

Though SEEDS: The Journey Begins is a work of fiction, it gives a frightening insight into a future that some fear can come true.

©2017 Cary Allen Stone (P)2018 Cary Allen Stone

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

Overall

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Space Exploration and Discovery!

First thing is that I love sci-fi about human life moving out to rest of the galaxy to colonize. The idea of taking a leap to become part of something new is captivating. The story and narration was pretty good and kept my interest. My only complaint is how quickly it passed, i can't wait to listen to the rest to come.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Christine Newton
  • Christine Newton
  • 07-30-19

3.5* - starting all over again on Titan

Some of my favourite science fiction books are about humanity going into space and attempting to establish a colony somewhere else in the solar system. The two novels at the top of my list are Seveneves (Neal Stephenson) and Red Mars (Kim Stanley Robinson). Though neither is perfect, I've re-read/listened to both of them multiple times over the years because the characters are well developed, there is plenty of thought-provoking philosophical stuff to think about, and there's a good amount of hard science. As a female reader, I also enjoyed seeing female characters playing important roles in the story. Plus, the narration in those audiobooks is compelling. So, those two books represent a 'gold standard' for me and I relish opportunities to explore new stories in this genre.

I really liked the premise for this trilogy - an existential threat provides the impetus to launch a colony ship towards Titan. For that reason alone, I'm willing to listen to this trilogy. The first installment is somewhat brief (the audiobook is around 4.5 hours in duration) and the basics are all there. We're introduced to a cast of characters - confusing to distinguish at first, especially in audiobook format where there is no Character list to refer to while reading, but I was able to sort them out as the book progressed. We're given a plausible context and chain of events that lead to the launch of the colony ship.

My reasons for not giving this story a full five-star rating were generally similar to some other reviewers: 1) not a lot of character development (I don't especially like any of the characters, because I don't know what they're thinking, what motivates them or makes them tick); 2) not a lot of tension (particularly during the first half of the book, which sometimes read like a series of project management status meetings); 3) more telling than showing; and, 4) no strong female characters (both female characters are lovers and/or daughters of more important male characters, and their compassion-based opinions/suggestions are often discounted by the men). Also, the final chapter seemed to be very out-of-place, the cliffhanger 'twist' came completely out of nowhere.

It also seemed to me like there were some "missed opportunities" that could have been expanded upon (which would have also lengthened the book and given it more meat). I put "missed opportunities" in quotes because the author alluded to them or mentioned them, but didn't expand on them. I don't want to get into spoiler territory, but most of these had to do with in-group vs out-group (or us vs them) distrust and suspicion: the in-group being the main cast of scientists/flight crew and the out-group being transhumans, Russians, Chinese, and colonists. THIS is the tension that I started picking up on during the second part of the story, as well as the tension between authoritarianism vs democracy. Hopefully, the author will pick up on these themes in the next part of the trilogy, now that he's planted the seeds. That's the rich kind of stuff that I like to think about when imagining humanity trying to re-establish itself in a new world.

And so, I give the story 3.5* because of its potential. I think that there's a lot of good opportunity here to work with.

I gave the performance 3.5* as well, mainly because the narrator sounded somewhat dispassionate (in my opinion). I increased the playback speed to 1.75-2x and found that pace better suited my preferences.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.