adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT
adbl_ms_membershipImage_includedwith_altText_B076FLV3HT

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $27.99

Buy for $27.99

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Ripples in Spacetime is an engaging account of the international effort to complete Einstein's project, capture his elusive ripples, and launch an era of gravitational-wave astronomy that promises to explain, more vividly than ever before, our universe's structure and origin.

The quest for gravitational waves involved years of risky research and many personal and professional struggles that threatened to derail one of the world's largest scientific endeavors. Govert Schilling takes listeners to sites where these stories unfolded - including Japan's KAGRA detector, Chile's Atacama Cosmology Telescope, the South Pole's BICEP detectors, and the United States' LIGO labs. He explains the seeming impossibility of developing technologies sensitive enough to detect waves from two colliding black holes in the very distant universe, and describes the astounding precision of the LIGO detectors. Along the way, Schilling clarifies concepts such as general relativity, neutron stars, and the big bang using language that listeners with little scientific background can grasp.

©2017 Govert Schilling (P)2017 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"An exciting history of the second great breakthrough of 21st-century physics." ( Kirkus, starred review)

What listeners say about Ripples in Spacetime

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    251
  • 4 Stars
    92
  • 3 Stars
    31
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    5
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    252
  • 4 Stars
    73
  • 3 Stars
    15
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    226
  • 4 Stars
    76
  • 3 Stars
    31
  • 2 Stars
    7
  • 1 Stars
    3

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Absolutely Loved it.

Absolutely loved this book. Easy to follow, even if you are not an Astro Physicist. Finally got a good understanding of the expansion of spacetime, how to understand the Big Bang & Gravitational Waves.

Great details on the engineering of LIGO.
And off course the first detection of Gravitational Waves in late 2015.

21 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Not so much about Ripples, but about measuring

Since this is the second time I review this title - I guess Audible deleted my previous review - I am summing up. I just don't have the will to give all the arguments over again that I gave the first time.
This book is undecided between telling a personal journey with anecdotes, vast amounts of name-dropping and place-mentioning that don't help with understanding the topic at all. and giving an insight into how "measuring quantum physics" developed over a century. While most of the historical sidenotes are interesting by themselves, they don't "help" that much with understanding what "ripples in spacetime ARE".
If you have a more or less "solid" background in what the current state of affairs in physics are, most of this book's content will be well known to you. If you don't you may find yourself slightly lost at times. So it *would* have been the subjective, personal experiences the author has "glimpse through" that could have made this a fascinating listen, but those incidents are rare, unconnected and unmotivated.

Narration is good, but very slow. I listened at 1.25 speed and that was fine.

16 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Enjoyable journey through space-time!

The author does an outstanding job of relating the history of the search for Einstein Waves in a way that the layman can easily follow.

The science is on point but necessarily devoid of complexity, making this a wonderful resource for non-physicists.

I enjoyed it from start to finish.

15 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Not horrible

Some interesting nuggets of information if you’re willing to wade through the superfluous, repetitive and watered-down cosmology background, as well as the author’s perplexingly continual and somewhat maddening practice of asking himself a question and then answering it. Why does he repeatedly do this? I know not.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Remarkable price of science

This book is unquestionably one of the most remarkable books I have encountered covering varies topics an historical idea of the development of space time ripples and LIGO development.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

basic info repeated

I ended up liking this book but the best gravity wave book hasn't been written yet.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

OK, Dumbed Down, but worth a listen

I found the book to be a good introduction to the story of gravitational waves. It is not particularly deep or technical. I needed an introduction and this served the purpose.

Again, the narrator performed pretty well except for pronouncing Einstein as eye-un-stein throughout the entire book. And as you might imagine, in a book about gravitation, the man's name comes up more than a few times. Who ever pronounces Einstein's name that way? If eye-un is right for ein, why not eye-un-steye-un? Is German for "one" = ein = eye-un? This drove me crazy.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Very good trip through the stars

Well written, very well narrated. This is a serious book with lots of scientific data and history about astronomers and their work and their major astronomic discoveries. But it is presented in a way that a layperson with a real interest, not only in “what’s out there” but “what does this mean”, will enjoy. At least, I did.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Covers the field well

Author missed a Leiden connection. Joe Weber began his work on General Relativity there in 1955 1956 working with Wheeler at Institute Lorenz.

Reader mispronounced many words

OTW well done



  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Well laid out

Descriptive and easy to comprehend for individuals with no or little science knowledge. I enjoyed this book and will most likely read it again.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Kindle Customertg
  • Kindle Customertg
  • 05-09-18

New information instead of another history lesson

Great stuff and learnt lots of new things instead of the usual history lessons that are regularly told in these kind of books.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Tim
  • Tim
  • 05-15-18

Outstanding

Really enjoyed this book. Some amazing content. Pitched just right for a moderately knowledgeable amateur to be able to follow the main thrust of the arguments.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Jack worsfold
  • Jack worsfold
  • 12-18-20

Superbly Writtem

This is NOT a SCIENCE BOOK! Yes there are scientific concepts and yes there are some technical descriptions but Govert Schilling writes in a beautifully paired back style. the story of how Gravitational Waves (GW) were finally proved to be real is both a detective story and a story of Human endeavor. Its expansive and engaging. Schilling writes with obvious passion for the subject and it is also great to be able to look up the references he mentions in the text of meetings and announcements to do with the discovery.

A genuinely wonderful book that deserves the time spent to listen. Do not be afraid of the science content. It is handled with easy to understand metaphors and where that is not possible the concepts are broken down and there is enough contextual repetition of concepts to ensure by the end you understand the subject. A real gem this one and worth every penny...

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for slipperychimp
  • slipperychimp
  • 02-07-19

Well balanced theoretical and practical physics

If you have even a passing interest in understanding the nature of reality, this is the book for you. The explanation of the practical side of how LIGO and the other gravitational wave detectors work off the back of the theory is excellent.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for JTT
  • JTT
  • 07-02-18

great book

exciting history and contemporary research of gravitational waves and the universe. highly recommended. told as a thriller

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Koroush Valiseh
  • Koroush Valiseh
  • 06-09-21

great

Still a working progress, looking forward to the future of the elaboration of this universe of ours. We hunting so many things that we not aware of. Hopefully technology evolves to give the inside view.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Stop the lights
  • Stop the lights
  • 11-11-19

Very clear and easy to understand

It's not a subject that is easy to understand but Shilling does a great job. Very clear and easy to understand.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 09-19-19

Ripples

Loved this book ! Didn’t wander off the path , an up to date review on where we are regarding gravity waves .

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Andy lane
  • Andy lane
  • 10-24-18

Great content shame about the American narrator.

As above, great content told in an engaging way. Sadly the narrator spoiled it somewhat by his confusing and incorrect use of decimal language for example instead of saying one point two three four five six he would say one and twenty three thousand four hundred and fifty six hundred thousandths which spoils the flow as I translated his American into correct mathematical language. Sounds petty but it really grates. Very sad as the author did an amazing job of a difficult subject matter. If you can deal with the jarring numeric language its a great book.

2 people found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Amazon Customer
  • Amazon Customer
  • 01-06-20

amazing book!!!!

easy to follow and understand with no formal science education
enjoyed this book so much I was dreading finishing it.

1 person found this helpful