• Remain in Love

  • By: Chris Frantz
  • Narrated by: Chris Frantz
  • Length: 15 hrs and 39 mins
  • 4.3 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Remain in Love  By  cover art

Remain in Love

By: Chris Frantz
Narrated by: Chris Frantz
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $21.81

Buy for $21.81

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

The Sunday Times best seller.

Chris Frantz's memoir tells the story of his life with Talking Heads, Tom Tom Club and his life-long love affair with Tina Weymouth. He remembers the early performances at CBGB alongside the Ramones, Patti Smith, Television and Blondie and recording the game changing albums, Talking Heads '77, More Songs About Buildings And Food, Fear Of Music, and Remain In Light. During a break from Talking Heads, Chris and Tina formed Tom Tom Club; in the process creating a hybrid of funk, disco, pop and electro that would have a huge impact on the club scene around the world.

Warm and candid, funny and heartfelt, Remain in Love charts the rise of a band that began as a dream and culminated with their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and reveals the once-in-a-lifetime love story and creative partnership between Chris and Tina, one of the greatest rhythm sections of all time.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2020 Chris Frantz (P)2020 Orion Publishing Group

Critic Reviews

"As the Brits say: I'm gobsmacked. I devoured this book.... One of the most potent examples of living the dream." (Debbie Harry)

"A great drummer who has written a great book." (Bill Murray) 

"A revealing inside account of the highs and lows of a band who looked and sounded like nobody else." (Olivia Laing, Guardian)

More from the same

Narrator

What listeners say about Remain in Love

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Ian
  • Ian
  • 11-22-21

Remain in love

Narration was a bit plodding but otherwise a very thorough and interesting story about his life in music

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Gary S.
  • Gary S.
  • 06-25-21

Loved it from the first word

I'm a Talking Heads fan so it was odds on I was going to like this book.

Surpassed all expectations, fast paced, not too starry, loads of facts, interesting if you like your music and of the 70's to 90's or so. Insights in to the stars you know and love, a few antics of Shaun Ryder and Bez for example, just a good all round book. Top work Mr Franz.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Christine
  • Christine
  • 06-23-21

Almost gave up.

Chris Frantz should record for insomniacs. He has such a mellow voice even when he's swearing. I listened 9n to the end though and I'm glad I did. This book is as much a travel log and a food journey as an autobiography.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for sselkie
  • sselkie
  • 06-10-21

Should've left it on the shelf

I've been a fan since my early teens, and this has almost put me off. Given the huge success of Talking Heads, there are way too many spiteful comments that leave a nasty taste. Band power struggles from the perspective of one, I don't think so.
Dreadful monotonous reading voice.
No reflection, self congratulation, and much smugness.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for D. Manley-Leach
  • D. Manley-Leach
  • 05-12-21

This started making sense

As a huge Talking Heads fan, I was eager to listen to this and I'm glad I did. Chris' life story is always entertaining and details the history of the Heads, the Tom Tom Club and his obvious and undying love for Tina Weymouth. It's a delight listening to stories of the various bands, musicians, artists, clubs and recording adventures that Chris has meet, or been involved with, from the Ramones, to Andy Warhol, Lou Reed and David Bowie to name just four. I loved being able to read about things from his point of view that had impacted on my life, such as their 1982 tour of the UK. I also loved the detailed history of each of their albums and the sheer work that goes into making them, I had no idea.
All that said, there's no great drama or tragedy in Chris's life, just the pure and driven passion of a true artist, and there's something rather lovely about meeting and marrying your college sweetheart and forging a meaningful career and life with them.

For any Talking Heads or New Wave fan this book is a must have! Very enjoyable.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Keith
  • Keith
  • 08-10-22

Interesting insights on the rise & demise of Talking Heads

Chris Frantz has a detailed, slow delivery style that I liked. Really interesting to hear how they formed, hit CBGB’s and never looked back. I knew David Byrne had his idiosyncrasies but his non subtle treatment of the band members and other people was sad to hear. Chris & Tina were the beating heart of Talking Heads and they should be proud of all they have achieved. Thoroughly recommend it to Heads fans as well as those interested how bands get a foothold in the industry.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Elastic
  • Elastic
  • 03-17-22

Tight start; saggy ending

I’ve read a couple of biographies over the years, so I’d heard a lot of these stories before. I was also aware that me understanding of Talking Heads is very David Byrne centric; so I wanted to hear an alternative perspective.

On that score, Frantz doesn’t hold back with the zeal of someone who has nothing to lose; what ever friendship might have been there is well and truly gone.

On balance however, the truth appears to rest somewhere in between. For instance, Frantz’ contention - that Busta Cherry was co-opted into the group by Byrne to undermine Tina - is contradicted by a recent interview with Jerry Harrison in Rolling Stone, who claimed both he and David wanted Cherry on tour.

To be sure, it must be challenging to share a band with an ambitious megalomaniac with no apparent social skills, but equally it can’t be easy sharing a band with a devoted married couple.

Unlike Sonic Youth, who broke up when Moore and Gordon separated, Frantz and Weymouth’s marriage and working relationship has endured. This in itself makes the book worthwhile.

For me, the most valuable insight appears in the closing paragraphs. And no, it’s not about the band, it’s about parenthood.

I admire and envy their success. For I was once in a band who attracted the attention of Seymour Stein. Alas, it was not to be.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Gary
  • Gary
  • 01-25-22

Essential

If you are a fan of Talking Heads, TTC, David Byrne or the New York Nu Wave, this is a fantastic book. Also gives best insight into Chris Blackwell’s Compass Point studios at its most prolific period

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Alan A.
  • Alan A.
  • 11-19-21

Sadly, a disappointment

I’m sorry to have to say that this isn’t very good on any level. It’s poorly written, poorly edited and poorly read.

If you like lists it might suit you: set lists, lists of gigs, lists of bands who have played at venues, recorded at studios or that other people have played with, produced, or met.

Left me thinking that David Byrne might not be the only person who was in Talking Heads who is not neurotypical.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Colin Sumby
  • Colin Sumby
  • 08-24-21

marvellous

a peek behind the scenes of one of the great movers and shakers in popular music of the 20th century.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for ausgraeme
  • ausgraeme
  • 10-09-22

A bit of a letdown

I’m a big Talking Heads fan so I was keen to hear some of their story from a member of the band. Unfortunately this memoir had me rolling my eyes constantly as Chris Frantz presented his version of the Talking Heads story. The details he concentrates on are so self centred and he seems to be on a constant mission to pump up his contributions to the band’s catalogue. At one point he reads the entire lyrics to an early Talking Heads song like it’s the highest form of poetry and then goes out of his way to tell you that HE wrote the lyrics. So what dude? He recites every word he contributed to Psycho Killer, including the ones that didn’t end up being included in the song!
I had hoped to hear details on each Talking Heads recording session but these are glossed over quickly in a matter of moments. Meanwhile he covers the comparatively fluff music of The Tom Tom Club in mind numbingly excruciating detail and again recites the banal lyrics he is apparently very proud of.
Then there is the elephant in the room - David Byrne. Ok, I understand Byrne had his flaws as a collaborator, but Frantz uses every opportunity he can take to criticise Byrne, at one point whinging like a child that he only ever received one compliment from Byrne - oh boo hoo Chris!
Apart from the above there is some mildly interesting anecdotes but the balance between documenting the touring life and the recorded output of Talking Heads is way out of kilter. Too many tour stories, too many boring stories of all the drugs he took and way too little of the Talking Heads catalogue documented. And he’s a lousy narrator. I read somewhere Tina Weymouth is also writing a book, hopefully it’s an improvement on this self indulgent memoir.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 12-28-21

Excellent!

For anyone into music this is a must read book.
It shows the true nature of Talking Heads through history in a down to earth and in my view an un-biased way.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for jez
  • jez
  • 01-01-21

Good story, not that well told

CF makes up for ordinary prose with a great story of lives well lived. A little insight into autism might help him and Tina forgive what appears from the outside to be utterly unacceptable behaviour on Byrne's part. But only in hindisght. Living with it day to day would be misery, and there was no wider understanding of it at the time. Fortunately they've always had each other, which is what makes their story, in the context of the life they lived, a great one.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Anonymous User
  • Anonymous User
  • 12-31-20

Too many unneeded details

an interesting story overall but chris is often excessive with some details. At one point, he not only describes the outfits each Talking heads band member was wearing, but explains how he had received the yellow polo shirt David was wearing as a gift, but passed it on to David as yellow was not really his colour. Chris also recounts the entire set list of most shows, which sounds somewhat robotic in the audio recording. I was also a little disappointed to hear very little reference to Davids asperger's, which would seem to provide a fairly reasonable explanation (though not necessarily an excuse)for many of the behaviours Chris seems to be so hurt by in this book.