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Publisher's Summary

Moving from the Paleolithic age to the present, Karen Armstrong details the great lengths to which humankind has gone in order to experience a sacred reality that it called by many names, such as God, Brahman, Nirvana, Allah, or Dao.

Focusing especially on Christianity but including Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Chinese spiritualities, Armstrong examines the diminished impulse toward religion in our own time, when a significant number of people either want nothing to do with God or question the efficacy of faith.

Why has God become unbelievable? Why is it that atheists and theists alike now think and speak about God in a way that veers so profoundly from the thinking of our ancestors? Answering these questions with the same depth of knowledge and profound insight that have marked all her acclaimed books, Armstrong makes clear how the changing face of the world has necessarily changed the importance of religion at both the societal and the individual level.

She makes a powerful, convincing argument for drawing on the insights of the past in order to build a faith that speaks to the needs of our dangerously polarized age. Yet she cautions us that religion was never supposed to provide answers that lie within the competence of human reason; that, she says, is the role of logos. The task of religion is to help us live creatively, peacefully, and even joyously with realities for which there are no easy explanations. She emphasizes, too, that religion will not work automatically. It is, she says, a practical discipline: its insights are derived not from abstract speculation but from "dedicated intellectual endeavor" and a"compassionate lifestyle" that enables us to break out of the prison of selfhood.

©2009 Karen Armstrong (P)2009 Random House

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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  • Overall
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Great recasting of how God should be interpreted

I'm an agnostic and I think this is a very important book. It provides a view into how the three major monotheisms were seen by their own practitioners over the ages and contrast those views with the modern view of God. It's a criticism of modern religious practice but it opened my eyes to the value that religion could and should provide were it approached in a less simplistic manner. This book is not meant to convert anyone, its very much an social/historical look at God. I find it a much more valuable view than the combative positions of the New Atheists.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Complete, engaging and educational

I'm just finishing my second listen and enjoying it as much as the first. It is a dense book and presents thousands of years of human religious history in detail. Despite the tremendous amount of information Karen Armstrong packs into this book, the overall themes are easy to follow.

I particularly appreciated that she chose to write a book focusing on unknowing and the elements of religious and spiritual practice that take one beyond language itself. If you want a general overview of religious history, you might choose her History of God or The Great Transformation. However, if you want an in-depth look at 2000 years of faith and the interplay of human practitioners and ineffable religious experience in Christianity, Judaism, Islam and Buddhism, this is the book.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Oh My God a Case

This is so convincing and so well done. I rarely take in a book this deeply and earnestly. I could not find a single place to really argue or gripe. This is a timeless work that deserves your time at least once through. The conclusions are profound and have shaken for the better my faith based view of the world. She almost apologized that she ended with Derrida and I appreciated her doing so, but she should have clearly ended with Zizek.
The Fat Free Atheist Chocolate Ice Cream Cookie Bar. It would have been the perfect cherry on top of her perfect point.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Susan
  • Penngrove, CA, United States
  • 10-29-12

Threw in the towel at Chapter 9

Would you try another book from Karen Armstrong and/or Karen Armstrong?

Yes, I have read Mohammed - A prophet for our time and Buddha and found them highly readable and fascinating.

What could Karen Armstrong have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

I couldn't follow this for the life of me. I guess she's making the point that we can only know the divine through Zen Buddhist or yogic type mystical and often severe practices. That point has been made by other 20th century writers in a more accessible manner. This is really a book meant to be read, not listened to in Audible format.

Have you listened to any of Karen Armstrong’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Karen Armstrong is an good reader, but after a while it gets to be like listening to a tape of a Religious Studies class . I've never listened to her other titles, but have read two of them.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Case for God?

Who did she write this for? What is her intended audience? I'm a relatively educated and well read man, but found myself dozing off. And the Audible format serves her poorly. You need a glossary to understand what she is saying - she is using Greek and Latin terms to express various religious states and relationships. What the heck do they mean?
The first time she uses a Greek term, she parenthetically mentions its meaning but after that she doesn't and there are so many it gets confusing.

Any additional comments?

Sorry I used up my credit.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Performance
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Slow going

Any additional comments?

I enjoy Karen Armstrong's work and have read several of her books in print form. This however has been a tough slog. I think it's the narration. The author reads the book, and I can't pinpoint what it is that I don't enjoy but I find myself reaching for the pause button soon after I start to listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
  • Tony
  • perrineville, NJ, USA
  • 01-10-10

the case for god

Just the best. so much information, you'll have to listern many times if you want to talk about this subject.

6 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall

Must listen for a good understanding of religion now and historical view

Karen Armstrong provides an overview of what religion was and what is has become. Must listen.

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Not what I expected, but so much better!

What did you love best about The Case for God?

[TLDR: This is a good book on religion and religious history. It's not threatening to anyone (except for maybe fundamentalists) and I think everyone could find something interesting within it.]

I'm not much of a book reviewer, (I'm not much of a book READER to be honest) but every now and then I come across a book that so piques my interest that I have to share it with others. In this case, it's Karen Armstrong's A Case For God. I pick up a religious book every now and then just to get the perspectives of educated persons on the subject, and what I was expecting was an opinionated attempt to prove or disprove God's existence like I've come across before.
This book, however, went in an entirely different direction. The author instead uses a massive amount of historical data to illustrate the progression and evolution of religion, the historical interactions between religious and non-religious organizations and philosophies, and to illustrate how the modern perspective of God may be fundamentally flawed.
I had honestly always had trouble floundering in the sea between my own perspectives on my personal views on faith and my frustration with modern American Christian organizations, but this book definitely done well to clear the water for me.
I would recommend this book to anyone who has even the remotest interest in the subject of God or religion in general. It approaches said subject from a very Agnostic angle that allows anyone to pick it up and find something interesting within its pages.

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Worth the Effort

This is not a light topic, so Armstrong's systematic, exhaustively researched, thoroughly processed, and compassionately presented work is a welcome voice in our age of shrill and strident polarized religious expression. Clearly a culmination and synthesis of her own struggle to break free from a religious cocoon to experience the reality of human spirituality, this work takes the reader on an odyssey through the major religions as they all seek, across time, to articulate central truths about the nature of God, the role if religion, and how we as individuals can engage in the latter to connect with the former.

Not a quick read, but, as befits the subject, a rich experience. Well worth the effort.

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Great Book on a huge subject

Full of so many great references to explore further. She offers a hopeful place for those of us seeking more mythos and less logos in todays world.