• Quantum Physics for Beginners

  • A Simple Guide for Discovering the Hidden Side of Reality. Master the Theory of Relativity and the Mechanics of Particles Like Einstein | With Easy and Practical Examples
  • By: James Fradkov
  • Narrated by: William Bahl
  • Length: 5 hrs and 24 mins
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (37 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

"Everything is energy": The mysterious reasons why only 0.0001 percent of humans really understand this principle, and how applying it every day in your life will let you get everything you desire....

In today's society, it is increasingly on the agenda to reason by stereotypes. The continuous distractions and surplus of information are leading us to an increasingly elusive and superficial perception of the world. Only a few discerning people are engaged in a careful and in-depth analysis of reality.

"Things are not always as they seem," says the famous Gibran, and quantum physics unquestionably sanctions the truth of this famous thought.

Einstein, Planck, Heisenberg, and Bohr (just to mention the most famous) were courageous visionaries - careful observers who did not stop at appearances and what the world of conventions proposed to them as absolute realities. This value was reciprocated with a revolutionary conception of life, which in some cases, for the weakest of hearts, led to madness. But for the most valiant, it was the keystone that allowed them to get everything they wanted out of their lives.

How strong is your heart?

In this essential guide to quantum physics, I will explain the most complex concepts in a very simple and understandable way, with the help of practical and immediate examples. Not only that, I will reveal to you the most intricate and hidden (in the worst mathematical formulas), real and tangible implications that you can apply in everyday life, giving you the opportunity to literally make a quantum leap.

Now for a little taste of what you will find inside this wonderful essay:

  • Where it all began
  • The basic concepts of quantum physics
  • The mysterious adventures of Einstein
  • Wormholes, time, and the fourth dimension: What do they have in common?
  • Where will relativity take us in the third millennium?
  • Light: Do you really know what it is?
  • What was hidden in Heisenberg's mind? 
  • And much more...

Learn concepts worthy of an excellent mind without effort, understand the most revolutionary and mysterious rules that govern the universe in which you live. Observe and interpret the reality that surrounds you with Einstein's eyes and change your life by catapulting it light years away from oppressive ordinariness. Don't wait any longer than you have already done to get hold of the keystone.... Act now!

Scroll up to the top of the page like a photon rocket and click on the "Buy Now" button!

©2020 James Fradkov (P)2020 James Fradkov

What listeners say about Quantum Physics for Beginners

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Language of quantum

Einstein and his dissident colleagues were faced with our own difficulty, that is, to understand the new atomic physics through the vocabulary and philosophy of macroscopic objects. We have to learn to understand that the world of Newton and Maxwell finds itself as a consequence of the new theory, which is expressed in the quantum language. If we were also as big as atoms, we would have grown up surrounded by phenomena that would be familiar to us; and maybe one day an alien as big as a quark would ask us: "What kind of world do you think we get if we put together 1023 atoms and form an object that I call "ball"? Perhaps it is the concepts of probability and indeterminacy that challenge our linguistic abilities. This is no small problem that remains in our day and frustrates even great minds. It is said that the famous theoretical physicist Richard Feynman refused to answer a journalist who, during an interview, asked him to explain to the public what force was acting between two magnets, claiming that it was an impossible task. Later, when asked for clarification, he said it was because of intuitive preconceptions. The journalist and a large part of the audience understand "force" as what we feel if we reward the palm of your hand against the table. This is their world, and their language. But in reality in the act of supporting the hand are involved electromagnetic forces, the cohesion of matter, quantum mechanics - it is very complicated. It was not possible to explain the pure magnetic force in familiar terms to the inhabitants of the "old world". As we will see, to understand quantum theory we must enter a new world. It is certainly the most important fruit of the scientific explorations of the twentieth century, and it will be essential for the whole new century. It is not right to let only professionals enjoy it.

This course is an excellent way to learn a new way to live and to respond to our universe...to nature and others.
Over all, a great course.

22 people found this helpful

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No math, promised, but just a few numbers

With this audiobook we would like to give you an idea of the tools that physics has developed to try to understand the strange microscopic world inhabited by atoms and molecules. We ask readers only two small efforts: to have a healthy sense of curiosity about the world and to master the advanced techniques for solving differential equations with partial derivatives. All right, we joked. After years of giving elementary physics courses to students of non-scientific faculties, we know how widespread the terror of mathematics is among the population. No formulas, then, or at least the minimum necessary, few and scattered here and there. The scientific vision of the world should be taught to everyone. Quantum mechanics, in particular, is the most radical change of perspective occurred in human thought since the ancient Greeks began to abandon the myth in favor of the search for rational principles in the universe. Thanks to the new theory, our understanding of the world has greatly expanded. The price paid by modern science for this broadening of intellectual horizons has been the acceptance of many apparently counterintuitive ideas.

But remember that the blame for this falls mainly on the shoulders of our old Newtonian language, unable to accurately describe the atomic world. As scientists, we promise to do our best Since we are about to enter the realm of the infinitely small, it is convenient for us to use the convenient notation of the "powers of ten".

16 people found this helpful

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James Fradkov Makes Q.M. Doable

In general, does not notice if what surrounds us is moving at the same speed as us, and if the motion is uniform and not accelerated we do not feel any sensation of displacement. The Greeks believed that there was a state of absolute rest, relative to the surface of the Earth. Galileo questioned this venerable Aristotelian idea and replaced it with a more scientific one: for physics there is no difference between standing still and moving with constant (even approximate) direction and speed. From their point of view, astronauts are standing still; seen from Earth, they are circling us at a crazy speed of 28 800 kilometers per hour. Galileo's sharpened ingenuity easily understood that two bodies of different weights fall at the same speed and reach the ground at the same time. For almost all his contemporaries, however, it was anything but obvious, because daily experience seemed to say otherwise. But the scientist did the right experiments to prove his thesis and also found a rational justification: it was the resistance of the air that shuffled the cards. For Galileo this was only a complicating factor, which hid the deep underlying simplicity of natural laws. Without air between the feet, all bodies fall with the same speed, from the feather to the colossal rock. It was then discovered that the gravitational attraction of the Earth, which is a force, depends on the mass of the falling object, where mass is a measure of the amount of matter contained in the object itself.

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Not impressed

Not as comprehensive or clear as expected. OK book. Did not enjoy it, forced to finish with hope. Wasted my time. Disappointed.

1 person found this helpful

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The bridge between science and spirituality

In the 21st century quantum mechanics has become the backbone of all the research in the atomic and subatomic world, as well as of wide sectors of material sciences and cosmology. The fruits of the new physics make thousands of billions of dollars every year, thanks to the electronics industry, and as many follow from the improvements in efficiency and productivity made possible by the systematic use of quantum laws. Some physicists a bit rebellious, however, driven by the cheers of a certain type of philosophers, still continues to seek a deeper meaning, a principle hidden within quantum mechanics in which determinism is found. But it is a minority. Why is quantum physics disturbing, from a psychological point of view? In a famous passage of a letter to Max Born, Einstein wrote: "You believe that God plays dice with the world, I believe instead that everything obeys a law, in a world of objective reality that I try to grasp through furiously speculative. Not even the great initial success of quantum theory manages to convince me that at the basis of everything there is randomness, although I know that younger colleagues consider this attitude as an effect of sclerosis. 3 Erwin Schrödinger thought in a similar way: "If I had known that my wave equation would be used in this way, I would have burned the article before publishing it [...] I don't like it and I regret having had anything to do with it".4 What disturbed these eminent figures, so much so that they were forced to deny their beautiful creation? Let us go into a little detail about these lamentations, in Einstein's protest against a God who "plays dice". The turning point of modern quantum theory dates back to 1925, precisely to the solitary vacation that the young German physicist Werner Heisenberg spent in Helgoland, a small island in the North Sea where he had retired to find relief from hay fever. There he had a revolutionary idea.5

1 person found this helpful

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Interested in things as they actually are? Read this book!

My life has been wanting to understand. Thanks to Newton, we mostly can understand the motion of most of what we can see. But all that we can see is made up of what we can not see.

This book explains some of what we can not see but does exist. And brings it to a level we can better understand. And does it in a way that will not either scare you off , or insult your intelligence.

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Poor narration

The narration sounds human, but acts like a program. Questions sound like statements and comma pauses are too long. The content sounded good, but the narration ruined it.

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Ruined by a poor reading

Fascinating content ruined by an absolutely poor reading. It sounds like a robot is reciting it.

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Interesting thoughts.

Planck was one of the greatest theoretical physicists active at the turn of the century, and even he did not like the fold that quantum theory had taken. It was the supreme paradox, since he had been the true founder of the new physics, besides having coined the term "how much" already at the end of the nineteenth century. We can perhaps understand the scientist that speaks of "betrayal" about the entry of the probability in the physical laws instead of the solid certainties of cause and effect. Let's imagine having a normal tennis ball and bouncing it against a smooth concrete wall. We do not move from the point where we threw it and continue to hit it with the same force and aiming in the same direction. Under the same boundary conditions (such as wind), a good tennis player should be able to get the ball in exactly the same place, shot after shot, until he gets tired or the ball (or the wall) breaks. A champion like Andre Agassi counted on these characteristics of the physical world to develop in training the skills that allowed him to win Wimbledon. But what would happen if the rebound was not predictable? Or if even on some occasion the ball was able to cross the wall? What if only the probability of the phenomenon is known? For example, fifty-five times out of a hundred the ball goes back, the other forty-five times it goes through the wall. And so on, for everything: there is also a probability that it will cross the barrier formed by the racket. We know that this never happens in the macroscopic and Newtonian world of tennis tournaments. But at the atomic level everything changes. An electron shot against the equivalent of a particle wall has a probability different from zero to cross it, thanks to a property known as "tunnel effect". Imagine what kind of difficulties and frustrations would meet a tennis player engaged in the subatomic world.

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Great explanation of quantum physics for the lay..

Great explanation of quantum physics for the lay person
Great course : not for the faint of heart because it requires some skills at calculation but it does the job and deliver on the promises of gaining a deeper understanding of general relativity objects.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 01-06-22

goes into depth

I like that the author explains atoms and electrons touches on a little chemistry

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  • James
  • 02-25-21

Science and Spirituality are complimentary.

Light is a form of energy. It can be produced in various ways, transforming electrical energy (as seen for example in a light bulb, or in the redness of toaster resistances) or chemical energy (as in candles and combustion processes in general). The sunlight, a consequence of the high temperatures present on the surface of our star, comes from nuclear fusion processes that take place inside it. And also the radioactive particles produced by a nuclear reactor here on Earth emit a blue light when they enter the water (which ionize, i.e. tear electrons from atoms). It only takes a small amount of energy put into any substance to heat it. At small scales, this can be felt as a moderate temperature increase (as well knows also those who dabble with DIY on weekends, nails get warm after a series of hammering, or if they are torn from the wood with pliers). If we supply enough energy to a piece of iron, it begins to emit light radiation; initially it is reddish in color, then as the temperature increases we see orange, yellow, green and blue tones appear in order. At the end, if the heat is high enough, the emitted light becomes white, the result of the sum of all colors.

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  • Efren Bright
  • 02-23-21

I'm so great-full to attend your lecture,

I'm so great-full to attend your lecture, thank you for arranging such a course.
As a BSc freshmen from Kerala,i was so curious to learn Quantum mechanics.And this course could tech my quarantine leave due to COVID 19.

Thank you sir

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  • Bertha
  • 02-22-21

Consciousness is Where Science and Spirituality ..

Consciousness is Where Science and Spirituality Intersect

Great course to learn about Audible Quantum Physics. I highly recommend this course. Thank you for offering this valuable course to me.

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  • Hall
  • 02-20-21

A Good Students Companion

Great information with this course could not be happier ! Looking forward to Part 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 and so on ! there is so much scope to this course the possibilities are endless

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  • Janet
  • 02-20-21

Entertaining and informative

I was pleased that a topic so complex was explained in a manner that does not intimidate.

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