Prague Fatale

Narrated by: Paul Hecht
Series: Bernie Gunther, Book 8
Length: 13 hrs and 27 mins
4.4 out of 5 stars (373 ratings)

Audible Premium Plus

$14.95 a month

1 audiobook of your choice.
Stream or download thousands of included titles.
$14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $20.72

Buy for $20.72

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Philip Kerr’s thrilling mystery series starring private detective Bernie Gunther has been hailed as “one of the great historical crime series” by Bookmarks Magazine. Set in 1941, Prague Fatale follows Gunther as he investigates a murder at the country estate of his old boss, SD member Reinhard Heydrich. Heydrich was throwing a dinner party for senior German officers when the victim was discovered - the body mysteriously locked in a room from the inside.

©2011 Philip Kerr (P)2012 Recorded Books, LLC

What listeners say about Prague Fatale

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    210
  • 4 Stars
    119
  • 3 Stars
    34
  • 2 Stars
    9
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    205
  • 4 Stars
    101
  • 3 Stars
    25
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    3
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    194
  • 4 Stars
    105
  • 3 Stars
    27
  • 2 Stars
    10
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Another Great Bernie Gunther Mystery!

All the books I've read in The Bernie Gunther series have compelling storylines and envelope you in the world and era in which they take place, and this book is no exception. I finished it within two days and was wishing for more by the end.

Unlike some of the recent books in the series, this one takes place entirely within the same period of time and setting, Berlin and Prague during WWII. Without giving too much away, it's another multifaceted mystery that begins in Berlin with Gunther working as an SD investigator after being recalled from the Russian Front. Eventually, he's called to Prague and with the blanket authority of Heidrich, ends up investigating a mass-murdering list of SD and SS officers, all of which are suspects in the murder of a fellow officer. There are some poignant moments and the irony of investigating each of these men for a single murder when they're responsible for so many other deaths already, is well-imprinted on the story.

As narrator, Paul Hecht, is adequate, but after listening to the fantastic work of John Lee in the first books in this series, it's difficult to equate him with Bernie Gunther. He doesn't provide the same kind of intonation or accents to the story. While he doesn't really add to the depth of book, he's at least an adequate narrator that does not distract from the story or make the book difficult to listen to, (which compared to some narrators, is a valuable quality in and of itself).

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

one of his best!

I've read nearly all Bernie Gunther series and this one, so far, is my favorite. I read it out of chronological order which posed no problems. As usual, Philip Kerr does a fantastic job of weaving a "can't put it down" book with research which paints a history lesson without a yawn. Loved it! Don't miss this one.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

One of our Top Literary & Storytelling Writers

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes ... a friend who has the patience to let a story unfold slowly, willing to await the character development and plot twists. And here's an insight into Germany under the Nazis.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Not my favorite

While I love Philip Kerr and the BG series. I found this one to be my least favorite so far. It was more of a classic parlor room detective who done it (set at a Nazi occupied (stolen) hunting estate. Too much talking and not much movement in the story. To me, it just felt like filler. I know writing a series, especially one as good as this, is a daunting task; so a few filler books are bound to happen and this fact in no way makes me turn away from such a brilliant series!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Spies and Nazis and castles (oh my)

This book has it all, and, though I thought it would feel a bit creepy reading about the adventures of a police detective in 1941 Berlin (and it does), still, the plot is gripping and the story held my interest. The characters are all complicated; not pleasant, but definitely not boring. None is really likeable, but I've learned to like Bernie Gunther nonetheless. He tries to do the right thing, but has a lot for an alcohol-muddled brain to handle. This is only the second book I've had from this series, but I think I've become a fan.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

a disappointment

I have read or listened to all of Philip Kerrs books--his stand alone books as well as the Bernie Gunther series. Typically I try to avoid books in series since the authors of such series seem to become tired of their own character as time goes on.
The Bernie Gunther character was initially so appealing that I stuck with this series and eagerly anticipated each new book. However the most recent books in this series, PRAGUE FATALE and FIELD GREY, were significant disappointments. It feels like Mr. Kerr is just churning out the series and no longer loves his character enough to continue to develop him in an interesting manner.
Also, with regards to narration, Paul Hecht's narraration doesn't hold a candle to John Lee's narration of the earlier books. But of course not many narrators can compare to John Lee.

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

A different view of WWII

I've loved all the books in the Bernie Gunther series and this is no exception. Great plot, believable characters and events. A good look at a part of the war we never studied, and from a perspective few authors give. Start at the beginning and enjoy many hours of great noir detectiving along with a look inside the Third Reich from a German who had to live in a Nazi world.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

overly complex plot but great narration

the narration is first-rate and the historical background is fascinating if depressing. the protagonist is unsparing in his own self-reflection and on his commentary on the events around him and on the perpetrators and the victims of those events. the plot however seems to have a lot of red herrings to get to the final denouement. Very solid but not his best.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Bernie early in the war

One thing I've learned about this series is that it doesn't follow an exact timeline. The stories sometimes go into periods after the war but have flashbacks to the war and even earlier giving background to something happening in the present. In this book, though, it takes place entirely in 1941/42 before the US has even entered the war with Berlin and Prague as the settings. The first 3/4 of the book could almost be called a police procedural where Bernie is called to Prague to investigate a murder with the curious part being the murder victim was a Nazi SS Captain and the suspects almost all Nazi SS officers, many of them senior officers. With Bernie not being much of a Nazi sympathizer but with his survival instinct on full alert he works the case as directed. Only after the case is solved does some real nasty Nazi stuff start happening.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Spellbinding

Like all Bernie Gunther novels, I couldn't stop listening. Although I admit, I don't think this is his best, I still would recommend it if you're familiar with this character. I'm not enamored with this narrator,though. But that has been pointed out before by other customers and I knew that when I bought it. Good entertainment.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for John Rodda
  • John Rodda
  • 07-09-12

Awful Narration

What a shame these books aren't read by Jeff Harding anymore. Paul Hecht reads them so badly that my suspension of disbelief is sorely tested. Paul reads a sentence like he's falling down stairs with a machine gun totally destroying the sense of the narrative with hiccups because he hasn't read ahead.
How could the "director" possibly have let this go?

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for John
  • John
  • 12-23-12

Prague Fatale

Kerr does it again. This is N0. 8 in the Bernie Gunther series.Gunther is a a detective, very much the Philip Marlow of the Weimar Republic and during the regime of Hitler. Paul Hecht hits the right notes on the narative. A welcom addition to the series, set in Berlin and Prague with a cast of historical charactors and a view of Germany in the 30's and 40's that feels real. This book - No. * is slightly different from the others - Kerr takes his already well-developed series protagonist Bernie Gunther and inserts him into a "classical" locked-room mystery setup, an almost Agatha Christie set up, but it works.





.